filcher

filch

[filch]
verb (used with object)
to steal (especially something of small value); pilfer: to filch ashtrays from fancy restaurants.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English filchen to attack (in a body), take as booty, Old English fylcian to marshal (troops), draw (soldiers) up in battle array, derivative of gefylce band of men; akin to folk

filcher, noun
filchingly, adverb
unfilched, adjective


purloin, take, swipe, lift, snaffle, pinch.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
filch (fɪltʃ)
 
vb
(tr) to steal or take surreptitiously in small amounts; pilfer
 
[C16 filchen to steal, attack, perhaps from Old English gefylce band of men]
 
'filcher
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

filch
"steal," 1560s, slang, perhaps from c.1300 filchen "to snatch, take as booty," of unknown origin. Related: Filched; filching.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

filch (sth) (from (so/sth)) definition


  1. tv.
    to grab or steal something from someone. : Who filched my wallet from me?
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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