fire-wall

firewall

[fahyuhr-wawl]
noun
1.
a partition made of fireproof material to prevent the spread of a fire from one part of a building or ship to another or to isolate an engine compartment, as on a plane, automobile, etc.
2.
a person, thing, or event that acts as a barrier or protection against something undesirable: The new employee handbook should create a firewall against unethical business conduct.
3.
Digital Technology. an integrated collection of security measures designed to prevent unauthorized electronic access to a networked computer system.
Also, fire wall.


Origin:
1750–60, Americanism

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
firewall
 
n
1.  a fireproof wall or partition used to impede the progress of a fire, as from one room or compartment to another
2.  computing a computer system that isolates another computer from the internet in order to prevent unauthorized access

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

firewall
1851 as a physical wall meant to prevent the spread of fire in a structure, from fire (n.) + wall. Computer sense is by 1997.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
firewall   (fîr'wôl')  Pronunciation Key 
A software program designed to protect a network by preventing unauthorized users from gaining access or by monitoring transfers of information to and from the network.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

firewall definition


A means of separating a computer network from outside networks for security purposes. A server outside an organization's own network may be used to funnel all incoming and outgoing traffic to assist in keeping out viruses, as well as to prevent unauthorized outsiders from gaining access to a network.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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