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fireproof

[fahyuh r-proof] /ˈfaɪərˌpruf/
adjective
1.
resistant to destruction by fire.
2.
totally or almost totally unburnable.
verb (used with object)
3.
to make fireproof.
Origin of fireproof
1630-1640
1630-40; fire + -proof
Related forms
nonfireproof, adjective
quasi-fireproof, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for fireproof
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I have glass rather than silver, and fireproof china ware in which I cook and serve the food.

    The Labour-saving House Dorothy Constance Bayliff Peel
  • The non-metallic parts of the room were, of course, fireproof.

    Highways in Hiding George Oliver Smith
  • Well, I'm supposed to have built a fireproof building—but you never can tell.'

  • It has the advantage of being absolutely waterproof and fireproof.

    Electricity for the farm Frederick Irving Anderson
  • Beat up six eggs, both yolks and whites, mix them with the milk, put it all in a fireproof dish and cook very gently.

British Dictionary definitions for fireproof

fireproof

/ˈfaɪəˌpruːf/
adjective
1.
capable of resisting damage by fire
verb
2.
(transitive) to make resistant to fire
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for fireproof
adj.

1630s, from fire (n.) + proof. As a verb, from 1867. Related: Fireproofed; fireproofing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for fireproof

17
18
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