fixture

[fiks-cher]
noun
1.
something securely, and usually permanently, attached or appended, as to a house, apartment building, etc.: a light fixture; kitchen fixtures.
2.
a person or thing long established in the same place or position.
3.
Machinery.
a.
any of various devices for holding work in a machine tool, especially one for machining in a straight line, as in a planer or milling machine.
b.
any of various devices for holding parts in certain positions during welding, assembly, etc.
4.
Law. a movable chattel, as a machine or heating plant, that, by reason of annexation to real property and adaptation to continuing use in connection with the realty, is considered a part of the realty.
5.
Fox Hunting. one of a series of meets scheduled by a hunt to take place at a time and location listed on a card (fixture card) that is sent, usually once a month, to each member of a hunt.
6.
the act of fixing.
7.
British. an event that takes place regularly.

Origin:
1590–1600; variant of obsolete fixure (< Late Latin fixūra; see fix, -ure), with -t- from mixture

fixtureless, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
fixture (ˈfɪkstʃə)
 
n
1.  an object firmly fixed in place, esp a household appliance
2.  a person or thing regarded as fixed in a particular place or position
3.  property law an article attached to land and regarded as part of it
4.  a device to secure a workpiece in a machine tool
5.  chiefly (Brit)
 a.  a sports match or social occasion
 b.  the date of such an event
6.  rare the act of fixing
 
[C17: from Late Latin fixūra a fastening (with -t- by analogy with mixture)]
 
'fixtureless
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

fixture
1590s, act of fixing, perhaps from fix on model of mixture. Meaning "anything fixed or securely fastened" is from 1812.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
If you're going to splurge, consider something custom-designed, such as a light
  fixture.
Position the old fixture where it will stay because it will be too heavy to
  move easily.
When artificial light is necessary, install dimmers or motion-sensor switches
  to reduce the energy used by the fixture.
Money funds are a fixture of today's financial marketplace.
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