flinches

flinch

1 [flinch]
verb (used without object)
1.
to draw back or shrink, as from what is dangerous, difficult, or unpleasant.
2.
to shrink under pain; wince.
3.
Croquet. to let the foot slip from the ball in the act of croqueting.
verb (used with object)
4.
to draw back or withdraw from.
noun
5.
an act of flinching.

Origin:
1555–65; perhaps nasalized variant of dial. flitch to flit, shift one's position

flincher, noun
flinchingly, adverb


1. recoil, withdraw, blench.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

flinch

2 [flinch]
verb (used with object)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
flinch1 (flɪntʃ)
 
vb
1.  to draw back suddenly, as from pain, shock, etc; wince: he flinched as the cold water struck him
2.  (often foll by from) to avoid contact (with); shy away: he never flinched from his duty
 
n
3.  the act or an instance of drawing back
4.  a card game in which players build sequences
 
[C16: from Old French flenchir; related to Middle High German lenken to bend, direct]
 
'flincher1
 
n
 
'flinchingly1
 
adv

flinch2 (flɪntʃ)
 
vb
a variant of flense

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

flinch
1570s, from obsolete flecche "to bend, flinch," probably from O.Fr. flenchir "to bend," from Frank. *hlankjan (cf. M.H.G. linken, Ger. lenken "to bend, turn, lead"). Related: Flinched; flinching.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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