flummery

[fluhm-uh-ree]
noun, plural flummeries.
1.
oatmeal or flour boiled with water until thick.
2.
fruit custard or blancmange usually thickened with cornstarch.
3.
any of various dishes made of flour, milk, eggs, sugar, etc.
4.
complete nonsense; foolish humbug.

Origin:
1615–25; < Welsh llymru, with ending assimilated to -ery

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World English Dictionary
flummery (ˈflʌmərɪ)
 
n , pl -meries
1.  informal meaningless flattery; nonsense
2.  chiefly (Brit) a cold pudding of oatmeal, etc
 
[C17: from Welsh llymru]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

flummery
1620s, a type of coagulated food, from Welsh llymru, of uncertain origin." Figurative use, of flattery, empty talk, is from mid-18c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Some people prefer a life of puffed up flummery, gladly ignoring the harm it inflicts on others.
It is still a delightful lot of flummery while it is going on, especially the major, central business of burglarizing the museum.
As a work in progress, the parliament invents its own flummery.
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