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flurry

[flur-ee, fluhr-ee] /ˈflɜr i, ˈflʌr i/
noun, plural flurries.
1.
a light, brief shower of snow.
2.
sudden commotion, excitement, or confusion; nervous hurry:
There was a flurry of activity before the guests arrived.
3.
Stock Exchange.
  1. a brief rise or fall in prices.
  2. a brief, unusually heavy period of trading.
4.
a sudden gust of wind.
verb (used with object), flurried, flurrying.
5.
to put (a person) into a flurry; confuse; fluster.
verb (used without object), flurried, flurrying.
6.
(of snow) to fall or be blown in a flurry.
7.
to move in an excited or agitated manner.
Origin
1680-1690
1680-90, Americanism; blend of flutter and hurry
Related forms
flurriedly, adverb
Synonyms
2. upset, pother, stir, to-do, fuss, fluster, ado.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for flurries
  • All month you've been watching flurries of leaves catch in the sunlight as they flutter down.
  • flurries of questions about mysterious triangle-shaped snowflakes may soon subside, thanks to new research on snowflake formation.
  • These giant snowballs sometimes smack into each other, sending up flurries of ice grains.
  • Snow flurries swept through the air, making it difficult to see.
  • There are weekends on the college football schedule when flurries of upsets cause wild fluctuations in poll voting.
  • The weather is wet, with copious rain and snow flurries, and the trees and vegetation have no leaves.
  • The weather forecast calls for morning flurries with possible afternoon clearing.
  • The lack of flurries this winter comes as a relief to many, but for others the absence has upset the rhythms of the season.
  • There are many other such crazy ideas that run through the film, which has more than its quota of madcap flurries.
British Dictionary definitions for flurries

flurry

/ˈflʌrɪ/
noun (pl) -ries
1.
a sudden commotion or burst of activity
2.
a light gust of wind or rain or fall of snow
3.
(stock exchange) a sudden brief increase in trading or fluctuation in stock prices
4.
the death spasms of a harpooned whale
verb -ries, -rying, -ried
5.
to confuse or bewilder or be confused or bewildered
Word Origin
C17: from obsolete flurr to scatter, perhaps formed on analogy with hurry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for flurries

flurry

n.

"snow squall" 1828, American English, with earlier senses of "commotion," etc., dating to 1680s; perhaps imitative, or else from 17c. flurr "to scatter, fly with a whirring noise," perhaps from Middle English flouren "to sprinkle, as with flour" (late 14c.).

v.

1757 in the commotion sense, from flurry (n.); 1883 in the snow sense. Related: Flurried; flurries; flurrying.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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