food

[food]
noun
1.
any nourishing substance that is eaten, drunk, or otherwise taken into the body to sustain life, provide energy, promote growth, etc.
2.
more or less solid nourishment, as distinguished from liquids.
3.
a particular kind of solid nourishment: a breakfast food; dog food.
4.
whatever supplies nourishment to organisms: plant food.
5.
anything serving for consumption or use: food for thought.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English fode, Old English fōda; compare Old English fēdan, Gothic fōdjan to feed; compare fodder1, foster

foodless, adjective
foodlessness, noun
nonfood, noun, adjective


1. nutriment, aliment, bread, sustenance, victuals; meat, viands; diet, menu. Food, fare, provisions, ration (s ) all refer to nutriment. Food is the general word: Breakfast foods have become very popular. Many animals prefer grass as food. Fare refers to the whole range of foods that may nourish a person or animal: an extensive bill of fare; The fare of some animals is limited in range. Provisions is applied to a store or stock of necessary things, especially food, prepared beforehand: provisions for a journey. Ration implies an allotment or allowance of provisions: a daily ration for each man of a company. Rations often means food in general: to be on short rations.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
food (fuːd)
 
n
1.  any substance containing nutrients, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, that can be ingested by a living organism and metabolized into energy and body tissueRelated: alimentary
2.  nourishment in more or less solid form as opposed to liquid form: food and drink
3.  anything that provides mental nourishment or stimulus: food for thought
 
Related: alimentary
 
[Old English fōda; related to Old Frisian fōdia to nourish, feed, Old Norse fœthi, Gothic fōdeins food; see feed, fodder]
 
'foodless
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

food
O.E. foda, from P.Gmc. *fodon (cf. Goth. fodeins), from Gmc. root *fod-, equivalent of PIE *pa-/*pi- "to tend, keep, pasture, to protect, to guard, to feed" (cf. Gk. pateisthai "to feed;" L. pabulum "food, fodder," panis "bread," pasci "to feed," pascare "to graze, pasture, feed," pastor "shepherd,"
lit. "feeder;" Avestan pitu- "food;" O.C.S. pasti "feed cattle, pasture;" Rus. pishcha "food"). Food chain is from 1927.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

food (fōōd)
n.
Material, usually of plant or animal origin, that contains essential nutrients, such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, or minerals, and is ingested and assimilated by an organism to produce energy, stimulate growth, and maintain life.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Food definition


Originally the Creator granted the use of the vegetable world for food to man (Gen. 1:29), with the exception mentioned (2:17). The use of animal food was probably not unknown to the antediluvians. There is, however, a distinct law on the subject given to Noah after the Deluge (Gen. 9:2-5). Various articles of food used in the patriarchal age are mentioned in Gen. 18:6-8; 25:34; 27:3, 4; 43:11. Regarding the food of the Israelites in Egypt, see Ex. 16:3; Num. 11:5. In the wilderness their ordinary food was miraculously supplied in the manna. They had also quails (Ex. 16:11-13; Num. 11:31). In the law of Moses there are special regulations as to the animals to be used for food (Lev. 11; Deut. 14:3-21). The Jews were also forbidden to use as food anything that had been consecrated to idols (Ex. 34:15), or animals that had died of disease or had been torn by wild beasts (Ex. 22:31; Lev. 22:8). (See also for other restrictions Ex. 23:19; 29:13-22; Lev. 3:4-9; 9:18, 19; 22:8; Deut. 14:21.) But beyond these restrictions they had a large grant from God (Deut. 14:26; 32:13, 14). Food was prepared for use in various ways. The cereals were sometimes eaten without any preparation (Lev. 23:14; Deut. 23:25; 2 Kings 4:42). Vegetables were cooked by boiling (Gen. 25:30, 34; 2 Kings 4:38, 39), and thus also other articles of food were prepared for use (Gen. 27:4; Prov. 23:3; Ezek. 24:10; Luke 24:42; John 21:9). Food was also prepared by roasting (Ex. 12:8; Lev. 2:14). (See COOK.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
He took no other sustenance than bread and water, and usually abstained from
  all food two or three days together.
It smelled as sweet as sandalwood and was said to impart its fragrance to food
  and drink.
The material could be used for coatings on food and beverage cans, among other
  applications.
The new is food and drink to the advanced intellectual, but he can provide the
  new himself only in one way.
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