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forecast

[fawr-kast, -kahst, fohr-] /ˈfɔrˌkæst, -ˌkɑst, ˈfoʊr-/
verb (used with object), forecast or forecasted, forecasting.
1.
to predict (a future condition or occurrence); calculate in advance:
to forecast a heavy snowfall; to forecast lower interest rates.
2.
to serve as a prediction of; foreshadow.
3.
to contrive or plan beforehand; prearrange.
verb (used without object), forecast or forecasted, forecasting.
4.
to conjecture beforehand; make a prediction.
5.
to plan or arrange beforehand.
noun
6.
a prediction, especially as to the weather.
7.
a conjecture as to something in the future.
8.
the act, practice, or faculty of forecasting.
9.
Archaic. foresight in planning.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English (noun) plan. See fore-, cast1
Related forms
forecastable, adjective
forecaster, noun
reforecast, verb (used with object), reforecast or reforecasted, reforecasting.
unforecast, adjective
unforecasted, adjective
Synonyms
1. foretell, anticipate. See predict. 3. project. 4, 7. guess, estimate. 9. forethought, prescience.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for forecasting
  • But while earthquake prediction isn't yet possible and may never be, so-called earthquake forecasting has been making strides.
  • Most weather forecasters believe that accurate forecasting more than two weeks into the future will always be impossible.
  • The end never came, but that hasn't stopped people--over centuries and across cultures--from forecasting our collective doom.
  • The back of the card features practical tips relating to avalanche forecasting.
  • Even the best academic minds are often poor at forecasting specific demand, yet technical training is often highly specialized.
  • forecasting corporate profits is not an exact science, and it's easier to do for some companies than others.
  • But economic forecasts have a crummy record of forecasting reality.
  • But forecasting the next hot profession is missing the point.
  • And the predictions from tweets are more accurate than any other method of forecasting.
  • The systems are also kept as part of on-site weather stations used for longer-term wind forecasting.
British Dictionary definitions for forecasting

forecast

/ˈfɔːˌkɑːst/
verb -casts, -casting, -cast, -casted
1.
to predict or calculate (weather, events, etc), in advance
2.
(transitive) to serve as an early indication of
3.
(transitive) to plan in advance
noun
4.
a statement of probable future weather conditions calculated from meteorological data
5.
a prophecy or prediction
6.
the practice or power of forecasting
Derived Forms
forecaster, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for forecasting

forecast

v.

late 14c., "to scheme," from fore- "before" + casten "contrive." Meaning "predict events" first attested late 15c. Related: Forecasted; forecasting.

n.

early 15c., probably from forecast (v.); earliest sense was "forethought, prudence;" meaning "conjectured estimate of a future course" is from 1670s. A Middle English word for weather forecasting was aeromancy.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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