Forestaller

forestall

[fohr-stawl, fawr-]
verb (used with object)
1.
to prevent, hinder, or thwart by action in advance: to forestall a riot by deploying police.
2.
to act beforehand with or get ahead of; anticipate.
3.
to buy up (goods) in advance in order to increase the price when resold.
4.
to prevent sales at (a fair, market, etc.) by buying up or diverting goods.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English forstallen, verbal derivative of forstalle, Old English foresteall intervention (to defeat justice), waylaying. See fore-, stall2

forestaller, noun
forestallment, forestalment, noun
unforestalled, adjective


1. preclude, obviate, intercept, obstruct. 2. prevent, avert.
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World English Dictionary
forestall (fɔːˈstɔːl)
 
vb
1.  to delay, stop, or guard against beforehand
2.  to anticipate
3.  a.  to prevent or hinder sales at (a market, etc) by buying up merchandise in advance, etc
 b.  Compare corner to buy up (merchandise) for profitable resale
 
[C14 forestallen to waylay, from Old English foresteall an ambush, from fore- in front of + steall place]
 
fore'staller
 
n
 
fore'stalment
 
n
 
fore'stallment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

forestall
O.E. foresteall "an ambush, a waylaying," from fore "before" + steall "standing position" (see stall (1)). Modern sense of "to anticipate and delay" is from 1580s. Related: Forestalled; forestalling.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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