forever

[fawr-ev-er, fer-]
adverb
1.
without ever ending; eternally: to last forever.
2.
continually; incessantly; always: He's forever complaining.
noun
3.
an endless or seemingly endless period of time: It took them forever to make up their minds.
Idioms
4.
forever and a day, eternally; always: They pledged to love each other forever and a day.

Origin:
1660–70; orig. phrase for ever

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
forever (fɔːˈrɛvə, fə-)
 
adv
1.  Also: for ever without end; everlastingly; eternally
2.  at all times; incessantly
3.  informal for a very long time: he went on speaking forever
 
n
4.  informal (as object) a very long time: it took him forever to reply
5.  …forever! an exclamation expressing support or loyalty: Scotland forever!
 
usage  Forever and for ever can both be used to say that something is without end. For all other meanings, forever is the preferred form

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

forever
late 14c., for ever; from for + ever. One word from late 17c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
There is no better way to give a gift that will last forever, for the link between scent and memory is everlasting.
In the run-up to war, a photographer trains her camera on a city about to be
  changed forever.
One taste will probably make you swear off the commercial stuff forever.
Higher oil prices remind drivers that fossil-fuel supplies won't last forever.
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