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forfeit

[fawr-fit] /ˈfɔr fɪt/
noun
1.
a fine; penalty.
2.
an act of forfeiting; forfeiture.
3.
something to which the right is lost, as for commission of a crime or misdeed, neglect of duty, or violation of a contract.
4.
an article deposited in a game because of a mistake and redeemable by a fine or penalty.
5.
forfeits, (used with a singular verb) a game in which such articles are taken from the players.
verb (used with object)
6.
to subject to seizure as a forfeit.
7.
to lose or become liable to lose, as in consequence of crime, fault, or breach of engagement.
adjective
8.
lost or subject to loss by forfeiture.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English forfet < Old French (past participle of forfaire to commit crime, to lose possession or right through a criminal act) < Medieval Latin forīs factum penalty, past participle of forīs facere to transgress, equivalent to Latin forīs outside, wrongly + facere to make, do
Related forms
forfeitable, adjective
forfeiter, noun
nonforfeitable, adjective
nonforfeiting, adjective
reforfeit, verb (used with object)
unforfeitable, adjective
unforfeited, adjective
unforfeiting, adjective
Synonyms
7. surrender, yield, relinquish, forgo, waive.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for forfeiting
  • Any restaurant that fixes its service charge in advance is forfeiting a golden opportunity to motivate its waiters.
  • forfeiting their lands they and their fore-fathers toiled in.
  • They believe their society is resilient enough to adapt without forfeiting or compromising its traditions.
  • US is gradually forfeiting its ground as the global leader on all aspects.
  • May used her gifted actors as creatures who were constantly forfeiting, then winning back, the audience's affections.
  • And certainly forfeiting his own life in exchange for the lives he has taken cannot be said to be an unjust punishment.
  • forfeiting typically requires a bank guarantee for the foreign buyer.
  • So, a holiday gift, good deed and alternative to forfeiting leave is to give it to a co-worker or someone else in need.
  • In the case of the construction of a new home, you are forfeiting your right to a new home warranty.
  • Rescheduling after the date of the test will result in you forfeiting your application and review fee.
British Dictionary definitions for forfeiting

forfeit

/ˈfɔːfɪt/
noun
1.
something lost or given up as a penalty for a fault, mistake, etc
2.
the act of losing or surrendering something in this manner
3.
(law) something confiscated as a penalty for an offence, breach of contract, etc
4.
(sometimes pl)
  1. a game in which a player has to give up an object, perform a specified action, etc, if he commits a fault
  2. an object so given up
verb
5.
(transitive) to lose or be liable to lose in consequence of a mistake, fault, etc
6.
(transitive) (law)
  1. to confiscate as punishment
  2. to surrender (something exacted as a penalty)
adjective
7.
surrendered or liable to be surrendered as a penalty
Derived Forms
forfeitable, adjective
forfeiter, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French forfet offence, from forfaire to commit a crime, from Medieval Latin foris facere to act outside (what is lawful), from Latin foris outside + facere to do
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for forfeiting

forfeit

n.

c.1300, "misdeed," from Old French forfait "crime, punishable offense" (12c.), originally past participle of forfaire "transgress," from for- "outside, beyond" (from Latin foris; see foreign) + faire "to do" (from Latin facere; see factitious). Translating Medieval Latin foris factum. Sense shifted mid-15c. from the crime to the penalty: "something to which the right is lost through a misdeed." As an adjective from late 14c., from Old French forfait.

v.

c.1300, "to lose by misconduct;" see forfeit (n.). Related: Forfeited; forfeiting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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