forgiving

[fer-giv-ing]

Origin:
1680–90; forgive + -ing2

forgivingly, adverb
forgivingness, noun
nonforgiving, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

forgive

[fer-giv]
verb (used with object), forgave, forgiven, forgiving.
1.
to grant pardon for or remission of (an offense, debt, etc.); absolve.
2.
to give up all claim on account of; remit (a debt, obligation, etc.).
3.
to grant pardon to (a person).
4.
to cease to feel resentment against: to forgive one's enemies.
5.
to cancel an indebtedness or liability of: to forgive the interest owed on a loan.
verb (used without object), forgave, forgiven, forgiving.
6.
to pardon an offense or an offender.

Origin:
before 900; for- + give; replacing Middle English foryiven, Old English forgiefan

forgivable, adjective
forgiver, noun
half-forgiven, adjective
preforgive, verb (used with object), preforgave, preforgiven, preforgiving.
unforgivable, adjective
unforgivableness, noun
unforgivably, adverb
unforgiven, adjective

commute, forgive, pardon (see synonym study at pardon).


1. See excuse. 3. absolve, acquit.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
forgive (fəˈɡɪv)
 
vb , -gives, -giving, -gave, -given
1.  to cease to blame or hold resentment against (someone or something)
2.  to grant pardon for (a mistake, wrongdoing, etc)
3.  (tr) to free or pardon (someone) from penalty
4.  (tr) to free from the obligation of (a debt, payment, etc)
 
[Old English forgiefan; see for-, give]
 
for'givable
 
adj
 
for'givably
 
adv
 
for'giver
 
n

forgiving (fəˈɡɪvɪŋ)
 
adj
willing to forgive; merciful
 
for'givingly
 
adv
 
for'givingness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

forgive
O.E. forgiefan "give, grant, allow," also "to give up" and "to give in marriage;" from for- "completely" + giefan "give" (see give). The modern sense of "to give up desire or power to punish" is from use of the compound as a Gmc. loan-translation of L. perdonare (cf. Du. vergeven,
Ger. vergeben; see pardon). Related: Forgiven; forgiving
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Users were actually more forgiving of the arm when they were piloting it.
The halls of academe have long been a forgiving environment for absentminded
  professors.
Boarders on the lookout for peak to creek power in a gentler, more forgiving
  package will instantly come to prefer these bindings.
People are more forgiving if the robot warns them first that it might make
  errors or apologizes when it screws up.
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