forgo

[fawr-goh]
Also, forego.


Origin:
before 950; Middle English forgon, Old English forgān. See for-, go1

forgoer, noun
unforgone, adjective


1. forbear, sacrifice, forsake.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
forgo or forego (fɔːˈɡəʊ)
 
vb , -goes, -going, -went, -gone
1.  to give up or do without
2.  archaic to leave
 
[Old English forgān; see for-, go1]
 
forego or forego
 
vb
 
[Old English forgān; see for-, go1]
 
for'goer or forego
 
n
 
fore'goer or forego
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

forgo
see forego. Related: Forgoing; forgone
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
For the materialists who do science, the answer is a forgone conclusion and no
  other answers can be considered.
They don't do anything but speculate much to try to reach their forgone
  conclusion.
Charted above are the percentages of forgone work time dedicated to various
  activities outside the labor market.
By contrast, the flow of forgone returns smooths the cost of the equity
  transfer over many years.
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