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found2

[found] /faʊnd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to set up or establish on a firm basis or for enduring existence:
to found a new publishing company.
2.
to lay the lowest part of (a structure) on a firm base or ground:
a house founded on solid rock.
3.
to base or ground (usually followed by on or upon):
a story founded on fact.
4.
to provide a basis or ground for.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English founden < Old French fonder < Latin fundāre, derivative of fundus bottom, foundation
Synonyms
1. organize, inaugurate, institute, originate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for found upon

found1

/faʊnd/
verb
1.
the past tense and past participle of find
adjective
2.
furnished, or fitted out: the boat is well found
3.
(Brit) with meals, heating, bed linen, etc, provided without extra charge (esp in the phrase all found)

found2

/faʊnd/
verb
1.
(transitive) to bring into being, set up, or establish (something, such as an institution, society, etc)
2.
(transitive) to build or establish the foundation or basis of
3.
(also intransitive; foll by on or upon) to have a basis (in); depend (on)
Word Origin
C13: from Old French fonder, from Latin fundāre, from fundus bottom

found3

/faʊnd/
verb (transitive)
1.
to cast (a material, such as metal or glass) by melting and pouring into a mould
2.
to shape or make (articles) in this way; cast
Word Origin
C14: from Old French fondre, from Latin fundere to melt
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for found upon

found

v.

"establish," late 13c., from Old French founder (12c., Modern French fonder), from Latin fundare "to lay the bottom or foundation of something," from fundus "bottom, foundation" (see fund (n.)). Related: Founded; founding. Phrase founding fathers with reference to the creators of the American republic is attested from 1916.

"cast metal," late 14c., "to mix, mingle," from Middle French fondre "pour out, melt, mix together," from Old French fondre, from Latin fundere "melt, cast, pour out," from PIE *gheud- (cf. Gothic giutan, German gießen, Old English geotan "to pour"), from root *gheu- "to pour" (cf. Greek khein "to pour," khoane "funnel," khymos "juice"). Meaning "to cast metal" is from 1560s.

adj.

"discovered," late 14c., past participle adjective from find (v.). Expression and found in old advertisements for job openings, travelling berths, etc., attached to the wages or charges, indicates that meals are provided, from the expression to find one's self "to provide for one's self." "When a laborer engages to provide himself with victuals, he is said to find himself, or to receive day wages" [Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," 1848]. Hence, so much and found for "wages + meals provided."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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9
11
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