frailty

[freyl-tee, frey-uhl-]
noun, plural frailties for 3.
1.
the quality or state of being frail.
2.
moral weakness; liability to yield to temptation.
3.
a fault resulting from moral weakness: frailties of the human flesh.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English frailte, frelete < Old French frailete < Latin fragilitāt- (stem of fragilitās). See frail1, -ity

overfrailty, noun


1. delicacy, weakness, fragility. 2. susceptibility, suggestibility. 3. flaw, defect.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To frailties
Collins
World English Dictionary
frailty (ˈfreɪltɪ)
 
n , pl -ties
1.  physical or moral weakness
2.  (often plural) a fault symptomatic of moral weakness

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

frailty
mid-14c., from O.Fr. frailté, from L. fragilitatem, from fragilis (see fragility). Related: Frailties.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Yet politicians and central bankers are reluctant to admit to home-grown
  frailties.
She does not shrink from hinting at the human frailties of her heroes.
Technology robs us of our human abilities, frailties and idiosyncrasies.
Ideally, future centenarians who avail themselves to life-prolonging advances
  won't suffer the familiar frailties of old age.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature