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funeral

[fyoo-ner-uh l] /ˈfyu nər əl/
noun
1.
the ceremonies for a dead person prior to burial or cremation; obsequies.
2.
a funeral procession.
adjective
3.
of or relating to a funeral:
funeral services; funeral expenses.
Idioms
4.
be someone's funeral, Informal. to have unpleasant consequences for someone:
If you don't finish the work on time, it will be your funeral!
Origin of funeral
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English (adj.) < Medieval Latin fūnerālis, equivalent to Latin fūner-, stem of fūnus funeral rites + -ālis -al1; (noun), from early 16th cent., probably < Middle French funerailles < Medieval Latin fūnerālia, neuter plural of fūnerālis
Related forms
prefuneral, adjective
Can be confused
funeral, funereal, funerary.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for funeral
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • And Rupert said he would like to go to the funeral, if he may.

    Moor Fires E. H. (Emily Hilda) Young
  • Renny, give me that revolver, and I'll show you more fun than a funeral.

  • There will be the funeral and we shall have to take in some of the folks, I know.

    A Modern Cinderella Amanda M. Douglas
  • Knock at the door, whence the sable line of the funeral is next to issue!

    Main Street Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • III.86 the order of his funeral: the course of the funeral ceremonies.

British Dictionary definitions for funeral

funeral

/ˈfjuːnərəl/
noun
1.
  1. a ceremony at which a dead person is buried or cremated
  2. (as modifier): a funeral service
2.
a procession of people escorting a corpse to burial
3.
(informal) worry; concern; affair: that's your funeral
Word Origin
C14: from Medieval Latin fūnerālia, from Late Latin fūnerālis (adj), from Latin fūnus funeral
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for funeral
n.

mid-15c., from Middle French funérailles (plural) "funeral rites" (15c.), from Medieval Latin funeralia "funeral rites," originally neuter plural of Late Latin funeralis "having to do with a funeral," from Latin funus (genitive funeris) "funeral, funeral procession, burial rites; death, corpse," origin unknown, perhaps ultimately from PIE root *dheu- (3) "to die." Singular and plural used interchangeably in English until c.1700.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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funeral in the Bible

Burying was among the Jews the only mode of disposing of corpses (Gen. 23:19; 25:9; 35:8, 9, etc.). The first traces of burning the dead are found in 1 Sam. 31:12. The burning of the body was affixed by the law of Moses as a penalty to certain crimes (Lev. 20:14; 21:9). To leave the dead unburied was regarded with horror (1 Kings 13:22; 14:11; 16:4; 21:24, etc.). In the earliest times of which we have record kinsmen carried their dead to the grave (Gen. 25:9; 35:29; Judg. 16:31), but in later times this was done by others (Amos 6:16). Immediately after decease the body was washed, and then wrapped in a large cloth (Acts 9:37; Matt. 27:59; Mark 15:46). In the case of persons of distinction, aromatics were laid on the folds of the cloth (John 19:39; comp. John 12:7). As a rule the burial (q.v.) took place on the very day of the death (Acts 5:6, 10), and the body was removed to the grave in an open coffin or on a bier (Luke 7:14). After the burial a funeral meal was usually given (2 Sam. 3:35; Jer. 16:5, 7; Hos. 9:4).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Idioms and Phrases with funeral

funeral

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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10
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