furl body

furl

[furl]
verb (used with object)
1.
to gather into a compact roll and bind securely, as a sail against a spar or a flag against its staff.
verb (used without object)
2.
to become furled.
noun
3.
the act of furling.
4.
something furled, as a roll.
Idioms
5.
furl in a body, Nautical. to furl (a square sail) with loose canvas gathered at the mast, so as to make a harbor furl.
6.
furl in the bunt, Nautical. to furl (a square sail) by gathering canvas upward, so as to load the yard equally at all points.

Origin:
1550–60; compare Middle French ferler in same sense, perhaps representing Old French ferlier to chain, fasten, equivalent to fer firm (< Latin firmus) + lier to bind (< Latin ligāre)

furlable, adjective
furler, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
furl (fɜːl)
 
vb
1.  to roll up (an umbrella, a flag, etc) neatly and securely or (of an umbrella, flag, etc) to be rolled up in this way
2.  (tr) nautical to gather in (a square sail)
 
n
3.  the act or an instance of furling
4.  a single rolled-up section
 
[C16: from Old French ferlier to bind tightly, from ferm tight (from Latin firmusfirm1) + lier to tie, bind, from Latin ligāre]
 
'furlable
 
adj
 
'furler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

furl
1550s, possibly from M.Fr. ferler "to furl," from O.Fr. ferlier, perhaps from fer "firm" (from L. firmus; see firm (adj.)) + -lier "to bind" (from L. ligare). Related: Furled; furling.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Synonyms
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