furtive

[fur-tiv]
adjective
1.
taken, done, used, etc., surreptitiously or by stealth; secret: a furtive glance.
2.
sly; shifty: a furtive manner.

Origin:
1480–90; < Latin furtīvus, equivalent to furt(um) theft (compare fūr thief) + -īvus -ive

furtively, adverb
furtiveness, noun


1. clandestine, covert. 2. underhand, cunning.
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World English Dictionary
furtive (ˈfɜːtɪv)
 
adj
characterized by stealth; sly and secretive
 
[C15: from Latin furtīvus stolen, clandestine, from furtum a theft, from fūr a thief; related to Greek phōr thief]
 
'furtively
 
adv
 
'furtiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

furtive
late 15c., from Fr. furtif, from L. furtivus "stolen, hidden, secret," from furtum "theft, robbery," from fur (gen. furis) "thief." Related: Furtiveness
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Still, here was the author's attempt to allow opposites-peril and bliss,
  furtive lovers and traditional family-to harmonize.
The reasons for his action have been lost in a confounding tangle of furtive
  transactions and deliberately destroyed evidence.
My furtive hour-long expeditions gave way to daylong escapes.
Every office encounter includes a furtive glance at the papers left out on a
  desk.
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