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gamecock

[geym-kok] /ˈgeɪmˌkɒk/
noun
1.
a rooster of a fighting breed, or one bred and trained for fighting.
Origin of gamecock
1670-1680
1670-80; game1 + cock1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for game-cock
Historical Examples
  • A man was training a game-cock in the pit; he was giving it lessons in the virtue of perseverance.

    Letters of a Traveller William Cullen Bryant
  • A tuft of hair stood up on his crown like the crest on a game-cock.

    The Man from the Bitter Roots Caroline Lockhart
  • It is said that even more patience is required to train a game-cock; and the process certainly seems elaborate.

    Java, Facts and Fancies Augusta de Wit
  • A friend described him as "a game-cock—with just a little strut."

    The Negro and the Nation George S. Merriam
  • The name was first written Atauhuallpa, meaning fortunate in war; after the fratricide, he was called Atahuallpa, or game-cock.

  • Indeed, in the East, it is used for exactly the same purpose as the game-cock.

    Bible Animals; J. G. Wood
  • They say that a game-cock is the bravest thing in the world.

    The Starbucks Opie Percival Read
  • This Gantlett was a game-cock, upon whose head the knight in his youth had won five hundred pounds, and lost two thousand.

  • A fourth was too pale, "A regular death's-head;" a fifth too red-faced, "A game-cock," she called him.

    Household Stories by the Brothers Grimm Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm
  • The English game-cock is prized here only for crossing with the native breed.

British Dictionary definitions for game-cock

gamecock

/ˈɡeɪmˌkɒk/
noun
1.
a cock bred and trained for fighting Also called fighting cock
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for game-cock

1670s, from game (adj.) in the sporting sense + cock (n.1). Figurative use by 1727.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Difficulty index for gamecock

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for game

7
9
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Nearby words for game-cock