Gay-Lussac's law

Gay-Lussac's law

noun Thermodynamics.
the principle that, for relatively low pressures, the density of an ideal gas at constant pressure varies inversely with the absolute temperature of the gas.
Also called Charles' law.
Compare Boyle's law.


Origin:
named after J. L. Gay-Lussac

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Gay-Lussac's law (ˈɡeɪˈluːsæks)
 
n
1.  the principle that gases react together in volumes (measured at the same temperature and pressure) that bear a simple ratio to each other and to the gaseous products
2.  another name for Charles' law

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gay-lussac's law

a statement that the volume occupied by a fixed amount of gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature, if the pressure remains constant. This empirical relation was first suggested by the French physicist J.-A.-C. Charles about 1787 and was later placed on a sound empirical footing by the chemist Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac. It is a special case of the general gas law and can be derived from the kinetic theory of gases under the assumption of a perfect (ideal) gas. Measurements show that at constant pressure the thermal expansion of real gases, at sufficiently low pressure and high temperature, conforms closely to Charles's law. See also perfect gas.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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