geeked

geek

[geek] Slang.
noun
1.
a digital-technology expert or enthusiast (a term of pride as self-reference, but often used disparagingly by others).
2.
a person who has excessive enthusiasm for and some expertise about a specialized subject or activity: a foreign-film geek.
3.
a peculiar or otherwise dislikable person, especially one who is perceived to be overly intellectual.
4.
a carnival performer who performs sensationally morbid or disgusting acts, as biting off the head of a live chicken.
verb (used without object)
5.
to be overexcited about a specialized subject or activity, or to talk about it with excessive enthusiasm (usually followed by out ): I could geek out about sci-fi for hours.

Origin:
1915- 20; probably variant of geck (mainly Scots) fool < Dutch or Low German gek

geeky, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
geek (ɡiːk)
 
n
1.  a person who is preoccupied with or very knowledgeable about computing
2.  a boring and unattractive social misfit
3.  a degenerate
 
[C19: probably variant of Scottish geck fool, from Middle Low German geck]
 
'geeky
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Main Entry:  geeked
Part of Speech:  adj
Definition:  filled with excitement and zeal
Example:  She is geeked about the holiday season.
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

geek
"sideshow freak," 1916, U.S. carnival and circus slang, perhaps a variant of geck "a fool, dupe, simpleton" (1515), apparently from Low Ger. geck, from an imitative verb found in North Sea Gmc. and Scand. meaning "to croak, cackle," and also "to mock, cheat." The modern form and the popular use with
ref. to circus sideshow "wild men" is from 1946, in William Lindsay Gresham's novel "Nightmare Alley" (made into a film in 1947 starring Tyrone Power).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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