genomics

[jee-noh-miks, ‐nom-iks]
noun (used with a singular verb)
the study of genomes.

Origin:
1985–90; see genome, -ics

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Collins
World English Dictionary
genomics (dʒɪˈnɒmɪks)
 
n
the branch of molecular genetics concerned with the study of genomes, specifically the identification and sequencing of their constituent genes and the application of this knowledge in medicine, pharmacy, agriculture, etc

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

genomics ge·no·mics (jē-nō'mĭks)
n.
The study of all of the nucleotide sequences, including structural genes, regulatory sequences, and noncoding DNA segments, in the chromosomes of an organism.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
genomics   (jə-nō'mĭks)  Pronunciation Key 
The scientific study of genomes.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
genomics [(juh-noh-miks)]

The field of science that studies the entire DNA sequence of an organism's genome. The goal is to find all the genes within each genome and to use that information to develop improved medicines as well as answer scientific questions. (See also proteomics.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

genomics

study of the structure, function, and inheritance of the genome (entire set of genetic material) of an organism. A major part of genomics is determining the sequence of molecules that make up the genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) content of an organism. The genomic DNA sequence is contained within an organism's chromosomes, one or more sets of which are found in each cell of an organism. The chromosomes can be further described as containing the fundamental units of heredity, the genes. Genes are transcriptional units, those regions of chromosomes that under appropriate circumstances are capable of producing a ribonucleic acid (RNA) transcript that can be translated into molecules of protein.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
The rough sequencing of the dog genome is the latest advance in the field of
  comparative genomics.
Modern findings and developments in genomics are fascinating and underscore the
  truth of evolution.
Genomics will probably make the life sciences the next arena for this kind of
  predictably-surprising innovation.
Maybe genomics or proteomics will usher in an age free of many diseases that
  continue to afflict us.
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