get a wiggle on

wiggle

[wig-uhl]
verb (used without object), wiggled, wiggling.
1.
to move or go with short, quick, irregular movements from side to side: The puppies wiggled with delight.
verb (used with object), wiggled, wiggling.
2.
to cause to wiggle; move quickly and irregularly from side to side.
noun
3.
a wiggling movement or course.
4.
5.
a dish of creamed fish or shellfish and peas.
Idioms
6.
get a wiggle on, Informal. to hurry up; get a move on: If you don't get a wiggle on, we'll miss the first act.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English wiglen; akin to Old English wegan to move, wēg motion, wicga insect; compare Norwegian vigla to totter, frequentative of vigga to rock oneself, Dutch, Low German wiggelen

outwiggle, verb (used with object), outwiggled, outwiggling.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
wiggle (ˈwɪɡəl)
 
vb
1.  to move or cause to move with jerky movements, esp from side to side
 
n
2.  the act or an instance of wiggling
3.  slang chiefly (US) get a wiggle on to hurry up
 
[C13: from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch wiggelen]
 
'wiggler
 
n
 
'wiggly
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wiggle
early 13c., perhaps from M.Du. or M.Flem. wigelen, frequentative of wiegen "to rock," from wiege "cradle" (cf. O.H.G. wiga, Ger. Wiege, O.Fris. widze), from PIE base *wegh- "to move" (see weigh). The noun is attested from 1816.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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