get one's goat

goat

[goht]
noun
1.
any of numerous agile, hollow-horned ruminants of the genus Capra, of the family Bovidae, closely related to the sheep, found native in rocky and mountainous regions of the Old World, and widely distributed in domesticated varieties.
2.
any of various related animals, as the Rocky Mountain goat.
3.
(initial capital letter) Astronomy, Astrology. the constellation or sign capricorn.
4.
a scapegoat or victim.
5.
a licentious or lecherous man; lecher.
Idioms
6.
get one's goat, Informal. to anger, annoy, or frustrate a person: His arrogance gets my goat.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English got, Old English gāt; cognate with German Geiss

goatlike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To get one's goat
Collins
World English Dictionary
goat (ɡəʊt)
 
n
1.  any sure-footed agile bovid mammal of the genus Capra, naturally inhabiting rough stony ground in Europe, Asia, and N Africa, typically having a brown-grey colouring and a beard. Domesticated varieties (C. hircus) are reared for milk, meat, and woolRelated: caprine, hircine
2.  short for Rocky Mountain goat
3.  informal a lecherous man
4.  a bad or inferior member of any group (esp in the phrase separate the sheep from the goats)
5.  short for scapegoat
6.  act the goat, act the giddy goat, play the goat, play the giddy goat to fool around
7.  slang get someone's goat to cause annoyance to someone
 
Related: caprine, hircine
 
[Old English gāt; related to Old Norse geit, Old High German geiz, Latin haedus kid]
 
'goatlike
 
adj

Goat (ɡəʊt)
 
n
the Goat the constellation Capricorn, the tenth sign of the zodiac

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

goat
O.E. gat "she-goat," from P.Gmc. *gaitaz (cf. O.N. geit, Ger. Geiß, Goth. gaits "goat"), from PIE *ghaidos "young goat," also "play" (cf. L. hædus "kid"). The word for "male goat" in O.E. was bucca (see buck) until late 1300s shift to he-goat, she-goat. (Nanny goat
is 18c., billy goat 19c.). Meaning "licentious man" is attested from 1675. To get (someone's) goat is from 1910, perhaps with notion of "to steal a goat mascot from a racehorse," or from Fr. prendre sa chèvre "take one's source of milk."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Easton
Bible Dictionary

Goat definition


(1.) Heb. 'ez, the she-goat (Gen. 15:9; 30:35; 31:38). This Hebrew word is also used for the he-goat (Ex. 12:5; Lev. 4:23; Num. 28:15), and to denote a kid (Gen. 38:17, 20). Hence it may be regarded as the generic name of the animal as domesticated. It literally means "strength," and points to the superior strength of the goat as compared with the sheep. (2.) Heb. 'attud, only in plural; rendered "rams" (Gen. 31:10,12); he-goats (Num. 7:17-88; Isa. 1:11); goats (Deut. 32:14; Ps. 50:13). They were used in sacrifice (Ps. 66:15). This word is used metaphorically for princes or chiefs in Isa. 14:9, and in Zech. 10:3 as leaders. (Comp. Jer. 50:8.) (3.) Heb. gedi, properly a kid. Its flesh was a delicacy among the Hebrews (Gen. 27:9, 14, 17; Judg. 6:19). (4.) Heb. sa'ir, meaning the "shaggy," a hairy goat, a he-goat (2 Chr. 29:23); "a goat" (Lev. 4:24); "satyr" (Isa. 13:21); "devils" (Lev. 17:7). It is the goat of the sin-offering (Lev. 9:3, 15; 10:16). (5.) Heb. tsaphir, a he-goat of the goats (2 Chr. 29:21). In Dan. 8:5, 8 it is used as a symbol of the Macedonian empire. (6.) Heb. tayish, a "striker" or "butter," rendered "he-goat" (Gen. 30:35; 32:14). (7.) Heb. 'azazel (q.v.), the "scapegoat" (Lev. 16:8, 10,26). (8.) There are two Hebrew words used to denote the undomesticated goat:, _Yael_, only in plural mountain goats (1 Sam. 24:2; Job 39:1; Ps.104:18). It is derived from a word meaning "to climb." It is the ibex, which abounded in the mountainous parts of Moab. And _'akko_, only in Deut. 14:5, the wild goat. Goats are mentioned in the New Testament in Matt. 25:32,33; Heb. 9:12,13, 19; 10:4. They represent oppressors and wicked men (Ezek. 34:17; 39:18; Matt. 25:33). Several varieties of the goat were familiar to the Hebrews. They had an important place in their rural economy on account of the milk they afforded and the excellency of the flesh of the kid. They formed an important part of pastoral wealth (Gen. 31:10, 12;32:14; 1 Sam. 25:2).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature