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gleed

[gleed] /glid/
noun, Archaic.
1.
a glowing coal.
Origin of gleed
950
before 950; Middle English gleed(e), Old English glēd; cognate with German Glut, Old Norse glōth; akin to glow

glee2

[glee] /gli/ Scot. and North England
verb (used without object)
1.
to squint or look with one eye.
noun
2.
a squint.
3.
an imperfect eye, especially one with a cast.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English glien, gleen; perhaps < Scandinavian; compare Old Norse gljā to shine
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for gleed
Historical Examples
  • gleed carried it like a gentleman, also the port that followed, though a little inclined to be garrulous about the latter.

    Peccavi E. W. Hornung
  • gleed had fully intended doing so, but the scornful suggestion killed the thought, and for once he had no last word.

    Peccavi E. W. Hornung
  • He threw up his hands and glowered at me with his gleed eye looking seven ways for sixpence as the saying goes.

  • Jest at that minnit, who shed come right into the gleed but Marian herself!

    The Wild Huntress Mayne Reid
  • gleed shrugged again, but this time there was no accompanying smile.

    Peccavi E. W. Hornung
  • To shoot and dine with him was to see gleed at his very best.

    Peccavi E. W. Hornung
British Dictionary definitions for gleed

gleed

/ɡliːd/
noun
1.
(archaic or dialect) a burning ember or hot coal
Word Origin
Old English glēd; related to German Glut, Dutch gloed, Swedish glöd

glee

/ɡliː/
noun
1.
great merriment or delight, often caused by someone else's misfortune
2.
a type of song originating in 18th-century England, sung by three or more unaccompanied voices Compare madrigal (sense 1)
Word Origin
Old English gléo; related to Old Norse glӯ
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gleed

glee

n.

Old English gliu, gliw "entertainment, mirth, jest, play, sport," presumably from a Proto-Germanic *gleujam but absent in other Germanic languages except for the rare Old Norse gly "joy;" probably related to glad. A poetry word in Old English and Middle English, obsolete c.1500-c.1700, it somehow found its way back to currency late 18c. In Old English, an entertainer was a gleuman (female gleo-mægden). Glee club (1814) is from the secondary sense of "unaccompanied part-song" (1650s) as a form of musical entertainment.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Difficulty index for gleed

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Word Value for gleed

7
9
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