Glenview

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glenview

village, Cook county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. It is a suburb of Chicago, located 20 miles (30 km) north of downtown, and lies on the north branch of the Chicago River. Illinois and later Potawatomi Indians were early inhabitants of the area, which was visited by French explorers Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet in 1673. Glenview Road follows a Native American trail leading from the Des Plaines River to Lake Michigan. The Native American peoples gradually ceded their lands, and through the Treaty of Chicago (1833) they surrendered their final claims to lands in northern Illinois. Settlement began in 1833, and the community was first named South Northfield. It was later known as North Branch, Oak Glen, and Hutchings before adopting its present name in 1895. Development of the village, which was originally an agricultural centre, was stimulated by the establishment in 1940 of the Glenview Naval Air Station (closed 1995). Glenview is now primarily residential, though it has some light industry, notably publishing, food processing, and toolmaking. Local attractions include The Grove, with a 19th-century schoolhouse and log cabin, and Hartung's License Plate and Auto Museum, with some 150 antique cars, trucks, motorcycles, and tractors. A folk festival is held annually (October). Nearby James Woodworth Prairie, a 5-acre (2-hectare) tract, is the state's only undisturbed black-soil prairie known to remain and a valuable subject for botanical research. Inc. 1899. Pop. (1990) 37,093; (2000) 41,847.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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