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glutton1

[gluht-n] /ˈglʌt n/
noun
1.
a person who eats and drinks excessively or voraciously.
2.
a person with a remarkably great desire or capacity for something:
a glutton for work; a glutton for punishment.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English glutun < Old French glouton < Latin gluttōn- (stem of gluttō), variant of glūtō glutton, akin to glūtīre to gulp down
Synonyms
1. gourmand; gastronome; chowhound.

glutton2

[gluht-n] /ˈglʌt n/
noun
1.
the wolverine, Gulo gulo, of Europe.
Origin
1665-75; translation of German Vielfrass, equivalent to viel much + frass eating, derivative of fressen (of animals) to eat
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for glutton
  • His sales are big and he's a glutton for work.
  • Which means, unless you're an unrepentant glutton, viewing choices must be made.
  • Perhaps I'm forgetful or a glutton for punishment.
  • It's just embarrassing to think like a glutton.
  • And glutton-like she feeds, yet never filleth.
  • The typical fantasy baseball player is a glutton for information, for anything that gives him the edge.
  • Break bread with a glutton, and you'll most likely eat a big portion too.
  • You are committing thefts from my parents' cellar and attic and dinner table to satisfy this glutton in you.
  • Two hungry meals make the third a glutton.
  • The second glutton has to pay for each dish as it is brought.
British Dictionary definitions for glutton

glutton1

/ˈɡlʌtən/
noun
1.
a person devoted to eating and drinking to excess; greedy person
2.
(often ironic) a person who has or appears to have a voracious appetite for something a glutton for punishment
Derived Forms
gluttonous, adjective
gluttonously, adverb
Word Origin
C13: from Old French glouton, from Latin glutto, from gluttīre to swallow

glutton2

/ˈɡlʌtən/
noun
1.
another name for wolverine
Word Origin
C17: from glutton1, apparently translating German Vielfrass great eater
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for glutton
n.

early 13c., from Old French gluton (Modern French glouton), from Latin gluttonem (nominative glutto) "overeater," formed from gluttire "to swallow," from gula "throat," from PIE *gwele- (see glut (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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glutton in the Bible

(Deut. 21:20), Heb. zolel, from a word meaning "to shake out," "to squander;" and hence one who is prodigal, who wastes his means by indulgence. In Prov. 23:21, the word means debauchees or wasters of their own body. In Prov. 28:7, the word (pl.) is rendered Authorized Version "riotous men;" Revised Version, "gluttonous." Matt. 11:19, Luke 7:34, Greek phagos, given to eating, gluttonous.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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