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[gohd] /goʊd/
a stick with a pointed or electrically charged end, for driving cattle, oxen, etc.; prod.
anything that pricks or wounds like such a stick.
something that encourages, urges, or drives; a stimulus.
verb (used with object)
to prick or drive with, or as if with, a goad; prod; incite.
Origin of goad
before 900; Middle English gode, Old English gād; compare Langobardic gaida spearhead
Related forms
goadlike, adjective
ungoaded, adjective
4. spur, push, impel. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for goaded
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • goaded into fury by the impertinence of a boy, he had used insulting words.

    The Virginians William Makepeace Thackeray
  • On the contrary, it goaded him on, and he finished by unburthening his mind in a flood of words.

    His Masterpiece Emile Zola
  • Lucan was goaded into complicity by the wrongs heaped upon him by Neros jealousy.

    Darkness and Dawn Frederic W. Farrar
  • goaded by something akin to despair, she was now more dangerous than resolute.

  • He can, when necessary, pester responsible persons till they are goaded into action.

    Personality in Literature Rolfe Arnold Scott-James
British Dictionary definitions for goaded


a sharp pointed stick for urging on cattle, etc
anything that acts as a spur or incitement
(transitive) to drive with or as if with a goad; spur; incite
Derived Forms
goadlike, adjective
Word Origin
Old English gād, of Germanic origin, related to Old English gār, Old Norse geirr spear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for goaded



Old English gad "point, spearhead, arrowhead," from Proto-Germanic *gaido (cf. Lombardic gaida "spear"), from PIE *ghei- (cf. Sanskrit hetih "missile, projectile," himsati "he injures;" Avestan zaena- "weapon;" Greek khaios "shepherd's staff;" Old English gar "spear;" Old Irish gae "spear"). Figurative use is since 16c., probably from the Bible.


1570s, from goad (n.); earliest use is figurative. Related: Goaded; goading.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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goaded in the Bible

(Heb. malmad, only in Judg. 3: 31), an instrument used by ploughmen for guiding their oxen. Shamgar slew six hundred Philistines with an ox-goad. "The goad is a formidable weapon. It is sometimes ten feet long, and has a sharp point. We could now see that the feat of Shamgar was not so very wonderful as some have been accustomed to think." In 1 Sam. 13:21, a different Hebrew word is used, _dorban_, meaning something pointed. The expression (Acts 9:5, omitted in the R.V.), "It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks", i.e., against the goad, was proverbial for unavailing resistance to superior power.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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