goal

[gohl]
noun
1.
the result or achievement toward which effort is directed; aim; end.
2.
the terminal point in a race.
3.
a pole, line, or other marker by which such a point is indicated.
4.
an area, basket, cage, or other object or structure toward or into which players of various games attempt to throw, carry, kick, hit, or drive a ball, puck, etc., to score a point or points.
5.
the act of throwing, carrying, kicking, driving, etc., a ball or puck into such an area or object.
6.
the score made by this act.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English gol boundary, limit; compare Old English gǣlan to hinder, impede

goalless, adjective
subgoal, noun


1. target; purpose, object, objective, intent, intention. 2. finish.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
goal (ɡəʊl)
 
n
1.  the aim or object towards which an endeavour is directed
2.  the terminal point of a journey or race
3.  (in various sports) the net, basket, etc into or over which players try to propel the ball, puck, etc, to score
4.  sport
 a.  a successful attempt at scoring
 b.  the score so made
5.  (in soccer, hockey, etc) the position of goalkeeper
 
[C16: perhaps related to Middle English gol boundary, Old English gǣlan to hinder, impede]
 
'goalless
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

goal
1530s, "end point of a race," perhaps from O.E. *gal "obstacle, barrier," a word implied by gælan "to hinder." The word appears once before this, in a poem from early 14c. Football sense is attested from 1540s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

goal definition

programming
In logic programming, a predicate applied to its arguments which the system attempts to prove by matching it against the clauses of the program. A goal may fail or it may succeed in one or more ways.
(1997-07-14)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
How they achieve those goals, what to tax and what to cut, should be no one
  else's business.
Setting your mind on a goal may be counterproductive.
The center's near-term goal is to make cheetahs self-sustaining in captivity.
Then Kenny scores an impressive goal and quickly begins to love the game.
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