Goliardic

goliard

[gohl-yerd]
noun (sometimes initial capital letter)
one of a class of wandering scholar-poets in Germany, France, and England, chiefly in the 12th and 13th centuries, noted as the authors of satirical Latin verse written in celebration of conviviality, sensual pleasures, etc.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English < Old French goliart, goliard drunkard, glutton, equivalent to gole throat (French gueule)+ -ard -ard

goliardery [gohl-yahr-duh-ree] , noun
goliardic, adjective
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goliard (ˈɡəʊljəd)
 
n
one of a number of wandering scholars in 12th- and 13th-century Europe famed for their riotous behaviour, intemperance, and composition of satirical and ribald Latin verse
 
[C15: from Old French goliart glutton, from Latin gula gluttony]
 
goliardic
 
adj

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