gregarine

gregarine

[greg-uh-rahyn, -er-in]
noun
1.
a type of sporozoan parasite that inhabits the digestive and other cavities of various invertebrates and produces cysts filled with spores.
adjective
2.
having the characteristics of or pertaining to a gregarine or gregarines.

Origin:
1865–70; < Neo-Latin Gregarina name of type, equivalent to Latin gregār(ius) (see gregarious) + -īna -ine1

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World English Dictionary
gregarine (ˈɡrɛɡəˌriːn, -rɪn)
 
n
1.  any parasitic protozoan of the order Gregarinida, typically occurring in the digestive tract and body cavity of other invertebrates: phylum Apicomplexa (sporozoans)
 
adj
2.  of, relating to, or belonging to the Gregarinida
 
[C19: from New Latin Gregarīna genus name, from Latin gregārius; see gregarious]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

gregarine greg·a·rine (grěg'ə-rīn')
n.
Any of various sporozoan protozoans of the order Gregarinida that are parasitic within the digestive tracts of various invertebrates. adj.
Of or belonging to the order Gregarinida.


greg'a·rin'i·an (-rĭn'ē-ən) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

gregarine

any protozoan of the sporozoan class Gregarinidea (or Gregarinea). Gregarines occur as parasites in the body cavities and the digestive systems of invertebrates. Representative genera are Monocystis in earthworms and Gregarina in locusts and cockroaches. Long and wormlike, gregarines may reach a length of 10 mm (0.4 inch). They often develop in host cells, from which they emerge to reproduce in some body cavity. Feeding by osmosis, some forms attach themselves to a body cavity lining by an anterior hook (epimerite), while others move freely. The class Gregarinidea may be divided into three orders on the basis of the type of life cycle. In the order Schizogregarinida, sometimes called Archigregarinida, a form of asexual reproduction called merogony (nuclear division followed by cytoplasmic division) precedes sexual union and spore formation; in the order Eugregarinida merogony is absent; and in the order Neogregarinida merogony occurs in the asexual phase, and each gametocyte produces one spore. The Neogregarinida are sometimes classified with the Schizogregarinida.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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