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grudge

[gruhj] /grʌdʒ/
noun
1.
a feeling of ill will or resentment:
to hold a grudge against a former opponent.
adjective
2.
done, arranged, etc., in order to settle a grudge:
The middleweight fight was said to be a grudge match.
verb (used with object), grudged, grudging.
3.
to give or permit with reluctance; submit to unwillingly:
The other team grudged us every point we scored.
4.
to resent the good fortune of (another); begrudge.
verb (used without object), grudged, grudging.
5.
Obsolete. to feel dissatisfaction or ill will.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English grudgen, gruggen, variant of gruchen < Old French gro(u)c(h)ier < Germanic; compare Middle High German grogezen to complain, cry out
Related forms
grudgeless, adjective
grudger, noun
ungrudged, adjective
Synonyms
1. bitterness, rancor, malevolence, enmity, hatred. Grudge, malice, spite refer to ill will held against another or others. A grudge is a feeling of resentment harbored because of some real or fancied wrong: to hold a grudge because of jealousy; She has a grudge against him. Malice is the state of mind that delights in doing harm, or seeing harm done, to others, whether expressing itself in an attempt seriously to injure or merely in sardonic humor: malice in watching someone's embarrassment; to tell lies about someone out of malice. Spite is petty, and often sudden, resentment that manifests itself usually in trifling retaliations: to reveal a secret out of spite. 4. envy.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for grudges
  • She knows each hippo's temperament, social status, family history and grudges.
  • But if you hold grudges in this line of work, you're never going to get anything done.
  • She's smiling when she says it, a half smile, some grudges mixed in with this late-term affability.
  • Ask about the chair's personality and how he handles grudges.
  • Anonymous attacks on a message board smack somewhat of personal grudges.
  • He pits his wits against the elder generation which grudges leaving its comfortable position to unsure fellows.
  • It is also about paranoia, and the dark tendency to hold grudges until one gets what one wants.
  • People who go on about old grudges are not to be indulged.
  • It's about the power and grudges of tabloid newspapers.
  • Along the way, they pummel each other verbally with their constant squabbling and dredge up several decades of pent-up grudges.
British Dictionary definitions for grudges

grudge

/ɡrʌdʒ/
noun
1.
a persistent feeling of resentment, esp one due to some cause, such as an insult or injury
2.
(modifier) planned or carried out in order to settle a grudge: a grudge fight
verb
3.
(transitive) to give or allow unwillingly
4.
to feel resentful or envious about (someone else's success, possessions, etc)
Derived Forms
grudgeless, adjective
grudger, noun
grudging, adjective
grudgingly, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Old French grouchier to grumble, probably of Germanic origin; compare Old High German grunnizōn to grunt
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for grudges

grudge

v.

mid-15c., "to murmur, complain," variant of grutch. Meaning "to begrudge" is c.1500. Related: Grudged; grudges; grudging; grudgingly. The noun is mid-15c., from the verb.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with grudges
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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