grudging

[gruhj-ing]
adjective
displaying or reflecting reluctance or unwillingness: grudging acceptance of the victory of an opponent.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English. See grudge, -ing2

grudgingly, adverb
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World English Dictionary
grudge (ɡrʌdʒ)
 
n
1.  a persistent feeling of resentment, esp one due to some cause, such as an insult or injury
2.  (modifier) planned or carried out in order to settle a grudge: a grudge fight
 
vb
3.  (tr) to give or allow unwillingly
4.  to feel resentful or envious about (someone else's success, possessions, etc)
 
[C15: from Old French grouchier to grumble, probably of Germanic origin; compare Old High German grunnizōn to grunt]
 
'grudgeless
 
adj
 
'grudger
 
n
 
'grudging
 
adj
 
'grudgingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

grudge
mid-15c., grucchen, from O.Fr. groucher "to murmur, to grumble," of unknown origin, probably ultimately imitative. Related: Grudging; grudgingly. The noun is late 15c., from the verb.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But that's the back-door route, creating the impression that it is being done
  grudgingly.
He gave little ground to critics and surrendered even that grudgingly.
The bankers who have been grilled by the body are grudgingly complimentary.
There was a time when casinos only grudgingly tolerated slot machines.
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