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gullible

[guhl-uh-buh l] /ˈgʌl ə bəl/
adjective
1.
easily deceived or cheated.
Also, gullable.
Origin
1815-1825
1815-25; gull2 + -ible
Related forms
gullibility, noun
gullibly, adverb
Synonyms
credulous, trusting, naive, innocent, simple, green.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for gullible
  • It's a pity some are too gullible to see it.
  • You guys are either being gullible or disingenuous.
  • And purse dealers take advantage of the gullible.
  • Diehl described his daughter as intelligent but gullible.
  • To the gullible, you've just made your opponent look like a nut and you a reasonable person.
  • Fortunately, the readers here aren't so gullible.
  • And people are just so gullible.
  • Stanfield said the gullible fellow actually believed him.
  • One of this book's many contentions is that we are gullible enough to think that any scientific-sounding data we read is true.
  • Sorry to have contributed to the hype, I can be rather gullible and quick to be alarmed.
British Dictionary definitions for gullible

gullible

/ˈɡʌləbəl/
adjective
1.
easily taken in or tricked
Derived Forms
gullibility, noun
gullibly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gullible
adj.

1825, apparently a back-formation from gullibility. Gullable is attested from 1818.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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