gunny

[guhn-ee]
noun, plural gunnies.
a strong, coarse material made commonly from jute, especially for bags or sacks; burlap.

Origin:
1705–15; < Hindi gonī < Sanskrit: sack, perhaps orig. of hide; cf. gaur

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World English Dictionary
gunny (ˈɡʌnɪ)
 
n , pl -nies
1.  a coarse hard-wearing fabric usually made from jute and used for sacks, etc
2.  Also called: gunny sack a sack made from this fabric
 
[C18: from Hindi gōnī, from Sanskrit gonī sack, probably of Dravidian origin]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gunny
1711, Anglo-Indian goney "coarse fabric," from Hindi goni, from Skt. goni "sack."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The chests were sealed with pitch, sewn into gunny or hides and sent for trading or to market.
The effect of incubation of water-soaked seed under gunny bag cover on the incidence of loose smut in wheat.
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