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8 Wintry Words to Defrost Your Vocabulary

gust1

[guhst] /gʌst/
noun
1.
a sudden, strong blast of wind.
2.
a sudden rush or burst of water, fire, smoke, sound, etc.
3.
an outburst of passionate feeling.
verb (used without object)
4.
to blow or rush in gusts.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; < Old Norse gustr a gust, akin to gjōsa, gusa to gust
Related forms
gustless, adjective
Synonyms
1. See wind1 .

gust2

[guhst] /gʌst/
noun
1.
Archaic. flavor or taste.
2.
Obsolete. enjoyment or gratification.
verb (used with object)
3.
Scot. to taste; savor.
Origin
1400-50; late Middle English < Latin gustus a tasting (of food), eating a little, akin to gustāre to taste
Related forms
gustable, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for gusts
  • Around the same time, researchers also started developing ways to manage and reduce the effect of gusts.
  • The company printed new ads showing open windows and gusts of fresh air.
  • Then, one stormy winter evening, a chopper nearly missed the top of the building because of the wind gusts.
  • If you achieve this, then side gusts of wind and random perturbations are self-correcting instead of self-amplifying.
  • Thunder growled in the distance, and gusts of biting wind were driving huge drops of rain over the thirsty plain.
  • Sudden wind gusts put the gearbox under tremendous mechanical stress.
  • The free-swinging wing can weather-vane its way through gusts without transferring the buffets to the fuselage.
  • Then came a rainstorm with gusts that nearly ripped his shelter from the ground.
  • Intercepted by curtains of boughs, the gusts fade to a breeze at ground level.
  • The wind gusts against your face, your body gliding smoothly against a backdrop of fuzzy blue and gray skies.
British Dictionary definitions for gusts

gust

/ɡʌst/
noun
1.
a sudden blast of wind
2.
a sudden rush of smoke, sound, etc
3.
an outburst of emotion
verb (intransitive)
4.
to blow in gusts: the wind was gusting to more than 50 mph
Word Origin
C16: from Old Norse gustr; related to gjōsa to gush; see geyser
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gusts

gust

n.

1580s, possibly a dialectal survival from Old Norse gustr "a cold blast of wind" (related to gusa "to gush, spurt") or Old High German gussa "flood," both from Proto-Germanic *gustiz, from PIE *gheus-, from root *gheu- "to pour" (see found (2)). Probably originally in English as a nautical term. As a verb, from 1813. Related: Gusted; gusting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for gusts

gust

in meteorology, a sudden increase in wind speed above the average wind speed. It is briefer than a squall and usually lasts 20 seconds or less. Air turbulence around an obstacle causes gusts; they occur frequently over buildings and irregular ground and are less frequent over water. The term gust also denotes a sudden change in wind speed relative to a flying aircraft.

Learn more about gust with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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