habituation

[huh-bich-oo-ey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act of habituating.
2.
the condition of being habituated.
3.
physiological tolerance to or psychological dependence on a drug, short of addiction.
4.
reduction of psychological or behavioral response occurring when a specific stimulus occurs repeatedly.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English. See habituate, -ion

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World English Dictionary
habituation (həˌbɪtjʊˈeɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act or process of habituating
2.  psychol Compare extinction the temporary waning of an innate response that occurs when it is elicited many times in succession

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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

habituation ha·bit·u·a·tion (hə-bĭch'ōō-ā'shən)
n.

  1. The process of habituating or the state of being habituated.

  2. Physiological tolerance to a drug resulting from repeated use.

  3. Psychological dependence on a drug.

  4. The decline of a conditioned response following repeated exposure to the conditioned stimulus.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
habituation   (hə-bĭch'-ā'shən)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. The gradual decline of a response to a stimulus resulting from repeated exposure to the stimulus.

  2. Physiological tolerance for a drug resulting from repeated use.

  3. Psychological dependence on a drug resulting from repeated use.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Because of their inquisitiveness and habituation to human feeding, the herds
  can be encountered right along the roads.
The goal of the treatment is habituation, a form of learning in which a
  response to a stimulus diminishes with repeated exposure.
Exposure theorists require specific doses, ie continuous stimulation with
  response prevention, to effect habituation.
Once they experiment a few times, habituation rears its ugly head.
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