half smothered

smother

[smuhth-er]
verb (used with object)
1.
to stifle or suffocate, as by smoke or other means of preventing free breathing.
2.
to extinguish or deaden (fire, coals, etc.) by covering so as to exclude air.
3.
to cover closely or thickly; envelop: to smother a steak with mushrooms.
4.
to suppress or repress: to smother feelings.
5.
Cookery. to steam (food) slowly in a heavy, tightly closed vessel with a minimum of liquid: smothered chicken and onions.
verb (used without object)
6.
to become stifled or suffocated; be prevented from breathing.
7.
to be stifled; be suppressed or concealed.
noun
8.
dense, stifling smoke.
9.
a smoking or smoldering state, as of burning matter.
10.
dust, fog, spray, etc., in a dense or enveloping cloud.
11.
an overspreading profusion of anything: a smother of papers.

Origin:
1125–75; (noun) Middle English smorther dense smoke; akin to Old English smorian to suffocate; (v.) Middle English smo(r)theren, derivative of the noun

smotherable, adjective
half-smothered, adjective
unsmotherable, adjective
unsmothered, adjective
unsmothering, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
smother (ˈsmʌðə)
 
vb
1.  to suffocate or stifle by cutting off or being cut off from the air
2.  (tr) to surround (with) or envelop (in): he smothered her with love
3.  (tr) to extinguish (a fire) by covering so as to cut it off from the air
4.  to be or cause to be suppressed or stifled: smother a giggle
5.  (tr) to cook or serve (food) thickly covered with sauce, etc
 
n
6.  anything, such as a cloud of smoke, that stifles
7.  a profusion or turmoil
8.  archaic a state of smouldering or a smouldering fire
 
[Old English smorian to suffocate; related to Middle Low German smōren]
 
'smothery
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

smother
c.1200, "to suffocate with smoke," from smorthre (n.) "dense, suffocating smoke" (c.1175), from stem of O.E. smorian "to suffocate, choke," possibly connected to smolder. Meaning "to kill by suffocation" is from 1548; sense of "to extinguish a fire" is from 1591. Sense of
"stifle, repress" is first recorded 1579; meaning "to cover thickly (with some substance)" is from 1598.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Matching Quote
"Where is the literature which gives expression to Nature? He would be a poet who could impress the winds and streams into his service, to speak for him; who nailed words to their primitive senses, as farmers drive down stakes in the spring, which the frost has heaved; who derived his words as often as he used them,—transplanted them to his page with earth adhering to their roots; whose words were so true and fresh and natural that they would appear to expand like the buds at the approach of spring, though they lay half smothered between two musty leaves in a library,—aye, to bloom and bear fruit there, after their kind, annually, for the faithful reader, in sympathy with surrounding Nature. I do not know of any poetry to quote which adequately expresses this yearning for the Wild. Approached from this side, the best poetry is tame.
I do not know where to find in any literature, ancient or modern, any account which contents me of that Nature with which even I am acquainted. You will perceive that I demand something which no Augustan nor Elizabethan age, which no culture, in short, can give. Mythology comes nearer it than anything. How much more fertile a Nature, at least, has Grecian mythology its root in than English literature! Mythology is the crop which the Old World bore before its soil was exhausted, before the fancy and imagination were affected with blight; and which it still bears, wherever its pristine vigor is unabated. All other literatures endure only as the elms which overshadow our houses; but this is like the great dragon-tree of the Western Isles, as old as mankind, and, whether that does or not, will endure as long; for the decay of other literatures makes the soil in which it thrives."
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