half-acre

acre

[ey-ker]
noun
1.
a common measure of area: in the U.S. and U.K., 1 acre equals 4,840 square yards (4,047 square meters) or 0.405 hectare; 640 acres equals one square mile.
2.
acres.
a.
lands; land: wooded acres.
b.
Informal. large quantities: acres of Oriental rugs.
3.
Archaic. a plowed or sown field.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English aker, Old English æcer; cognate with Old Frisian ekker, Old Saxon akkar, Old High German ackar (German Acker), Old Norse akr, Gothic akers, Latin ager, Greek agrós, Sanskrit ájra-; see also acorn, agrarian, agrestic, agriculture, agro-

half-acre, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
acre (ˈeɪkə)
 
n
1.  a unit of area used in certain English-speaking countries, equal to 4840 square yards or 4046.86 square metres
2.  (plural)
 a.  land, esp a large area
 b.  informal a large amount: he has acres of space in his room
3.  (NZ) farm the long acre to graze cows on the verge of a road
 
[Old English æcer field, acre; related to Old Norse akr, German Acker, Latin ager field, Sanskrit ajra field]

Acre
 
n
1.  a state of W Brazil: mostly unexplored tropical forests; acquired from Bolivia in 1903. Capital: Rio Branco. Pop: 586 942 (2002). Area: 152 589 sq km (58 899 sq miles)
2.  Old Testament name: Accho, Arabic name: `Akka, Hebrew name: `Akko a city and port in N Israel, strategically situated on the Bay of Acre in the E Mediterranean: taken and retaken during the Crusades (1104, 1187, 1191, 1291), taken by the Turks (1517), by Egypt (1832), and by the Turks again (1839). Pop: 45 600 (2001)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

acre
O.E. æcer "tilled field, open land," from P.Gmc. *akraz "field, pasture" (cf. O.N. akr, O.Fris. ekkr, O.H.G. achar), from PIE *agros "field" (cf. L. ager "field, land," Gk. agros, Skt. ajras "plain, open country"). Originally in Eng. without reference to dimension; in late O.E. the amount of land
a yoke of oxen could plow in a day, afterward defined by statute to a piece 40 poles by 4, or an equivalent shape (5 Edw. I, 31 Edw. III, 24 Hen. VIII). Original sense retained in God's acre "churchyard." Related: Acreage (1859).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
acre   (ā'kər)  Pronunciation Key 
A unit of area in the US Customary System, used in land and sea floor measurement and equal to 43,560 square feet or 4,047 square meters.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Acre definition


is the translation of a word (tse'med), which properly means a yoke, and denotes a space of ground that may be ploughed by a yoke of oxen in a day. It is about an acre of our measure (Isa. 5:10; 1 Sam. 14:14).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Matching Quote
"We have one other pond just like this, White Pond, in Nine Acre Corner, about two and a half miles westerly; but, though I am acquainted with most of the ponds within a dozen miles of this centre, I do not know a third of this pure and well-like character. Successive nations perchance have drank at, admired, and fathomed it, and passed away, and still its water is green and pellucid as ever. Not an intermitting spring! Perhaps on that spring morning when Adam and Eve were driven out of Eden Walden Pond was already in existence, and even then breaking up in a gentle spring rain accompanied with mist and a southerly wind, and covered with myriads of ducks and geese, which had not heard of the fall, when still such pure lakes sufficed them. Even then it had commenced to rise and fall, and had clarified its waters and colored them of the hue they now wear, and obtained a patent of Heaven to be the only Walden Pond in the world and distiller of celestial dews. Who knows in how many unremembered nations' literatures this has been the Castalian Fountain? or what nymphs presided over it in the Golden Age? It is a gem of the first water which Concord wears in her coronet.
Yet perchance the first who came to this well have left some trace of their footsteps. I have been surprised to detect encircling the pond, even where a thick wood has just been cut down on the shore, a narrow shelf-like path in the steep hillside, alternately rising and falling, approaching and receding from the water's edge, as old probably as the race of man here, worn by the feet of aboriginal hunters, and still from time to time unwittingly trodden by the present occupants of the land."
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