half-lived

lived

[lahyvd, livd]
adjective
having life, a life, or lives, as specified (usually used in combination): a many-lived cat.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; see life, -ed3

half-lived, adjective


Lived, meaning “having a certain kind or extent of life,” is not derived from the preterit and past participle of the verb live [liv] but from the noun life [lahyf] to which the suffix -ed has been added. The original pronunciation, therefore, and one still heard, is [lahyvd] which retains the vowel (ī) of life. Since the f of life changes to v with the addition of this suffix, as when leaf becomes leaved, this lived is identical in spelling with the preterit and past participle lived, and conflation of the two has led to the increasingly frequent pronunciation of this lived as [livd] in such combinations as long-lived and short-lived. Both pronunciations are considered standard.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

live
O.E. lifian (Anglian), libban (W.Saxon) "to be alive," also "to supply oneself with food, to pass life (in some condition)," from P.Gmc. stem *libæ (cf. O.N. lifa, O.Fris. libba, Ger. leben, Goth. liban "to live"), from PIE base *leip- "to remain, continue" (cf. Gk. liparein "to persist, persevere;"
see leave).
"According to the Dutch Prouerbe ... Leuen ende laetan leuen, To liue and to let others liue." [Malynes, 1622]
To live it up "live gaily and extravagantly" is from 1951. To live up to "act in accordance with" is from 1690s. To live (something) down "outwear (some slander or embarrassment)" is from 1842. To live with "cohabit as husband and wife" is attested from 1749; sense of "to put up with" is attested from 1937. Lived-in "inhabited, occupied" is first recorded 1873. Live-in (adj.) first attested, 1955. Expression live and learn is attested from c.1620.

live
1540s, "having life," later (1611) "burning, glowing," aphetic of alive (q.v.). Sense of "containing unspent energy or power" (live ammunition, etc.) is from 1799; live wire is attested from 1890; figurative sense of "active person" is from 1903. Meaning "in-person (performance)"
is first attested 1934.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

live (līv)
adj.

  1. Having life; alive.

  2. Capable of replicating in a host's cells.

  3. Containing living microorganisms or active virus, as a vaccine.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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