half-marked

marked

[mahrkt]
adjective
1.
strikingly noticeable; conspicuous: with marked success.
2.
watched as an object of suspicion or vengeance: a marked man.
3.
having a mark or marks: beautifully marked birds; to read the marked pages.
4.
Linguistics.
a.
(of a phoneme) characterized by the presence of a phonological feature that serves to distinguish it from an otherwise similar phoneme lacking that feature, as (d), which, in contrast to (t), is characterized by the presence of voicing.
b.
characterized by the presence of a marker indicating the grammatical function of a construction, as the plural in English, which, in contrast to the singular, is typically indicated by the presence of the marker -s.
c.
specifying an additional element of meaning, in contrast to a semantically related item, as drake in contrast to duck, where drake specifies “male” while duck does not necessarily specify sex.
d.
occurring less typically than an alternative form, as the word order in Down he fell in contrast to the more usual order of He fell down. Compare unmarked ( def 2 ).

Origin:
Middle English; Old English gemearcod; see mark1, -ed2

markedly [mahr-kid-lee] , adverb
markedness, noun
half-marked, adjective
well-marked, adjective


1. striking, outstanding, obvious, prominent.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
marked (mɑːkt)
 
adj
1.  obvious, evident, or noticeable
2.  singled out, esp for punishment, killing, etc: a marked man
3.  linguistics distinguished by a specific feature, as in phonology. For example, of the two phonemes /t/ and /d/, the /d/ is marked because it exhibits the feature of voice
 
markedly
 
adv
 
'markedness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

marked
"having a mark," O.E. gemearcodan (see mark (1)). Meaning "clearly defined" is from 1795. Marked man "one who is watched with hostile intent" is from 1833.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

mark (märk)
n.

  1. A spot or line on a surface, visible through difference in color or elevation from that of the surrounding area.

  2. A distinctive trait or property.

v. marked, mark·ing, marks
  1. To make a visible trace or impression on, as occurs with a spot or dent.

  2. To form, make, or depict by making a mark.

  3. To distinguish or characterize.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Matching Quote
"Once also it was my business to go in search of the relics of a human body, mangled by sharks, which had just been cast up, a week after a wreck, having got the direction from a lighthouse: I should find it a mile or two distant over the sand, a dozen rods from the water, covered with a cloth, by a stick stuck up. I expected that I must look very narrowly to find so small an object, but the sandy beach, half a mile wide, and stretching farther than the eye could reach, was so perfectly smooth and bare, and the mirage toward the sea so magnifying, that when I was half a mile distant the insignificant sliver which marked the spot looked like a bleached spar, and the relics were conspicuous as if they lay in state on that sandy plain, or a generation had labored to pile up their cairn there. Close at hand they were simply some bones with a little flesh adhering to them, in fact only a slight inequality in the sweep of the shore. There was nothing at all remarkable about them, and they were singularly inoffensive both to the senses and the imagination. But as I stood there they grew more and more imposing. They were alone with the beach and the sea, whose hollow roar seemed addressed to them, and I was impressed as if there was an understanding between them and the ocean which necessarily left me out, with my snivelling sympathies. That dead body had taken possession of the shore, and reigned over it as no living one could, in the name of a certain majesty which belonged to it."
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