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hallow1

[hal-oh] /ˈhæl oʊ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to make holy; sanctify; consecrate.
2.
to honor as holy; consider sacred; venerate:
to hallow a battlefield.
Origin of hallow1
900
before 900; Middle English hal(o)wen, Old English hālgian (cognate with German heiligen, Old Norse helga), derivative of hālig holy
Related forms
hallower, noun

hallow2

[huh-loh] /həˈloʊ/
interjection, noun, verb (used without object), verb (used with object)
1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for hallowing
Historical Examples
  • He rests his weary head under the hallowing sounds of the well-remembered bells of the past at the Mission Dolores.

    The Little Lady of Lagunitas Richard Henry Savage
  • The hallowing of Cramp Rings was not unlike the king's touch.

  • He had married her because he adored her and he wanted to protect her and love her under the hallowing shelter of matrimony.

    We Can't Have Everything Rupert Hughes
  • But this is a matter of self interest, and not of hallowing or consecrating the union.

    Ifugao Law R. F. Burton
  • It is difficult to understand how any person reared amid such scenes and relics could ever cast away their hallowing influence.

    Shakespeare's England William Winter
  • And so the hallowing of wine and sops was usual from the court to the cottage.

  • And fine old buildings they are: centuries have rolled over many of them, hallowing the old walls, and making them grey with age.

    Three Years in Europe William Wells Brown
  • Her soul peeped out once through her impassive face, hallowing it.

    Whirligigs O. Henry
  • Nothing could exceed in solemnity the "hallowing of the king," as the coronation ceremony was termed in Anglo-Saxon times.

  • Willingly wilt thou fast forty days upon this spot, for our church's hallowing.

    Star of Mercia Blanche Devereux
British Dictionary definitions for hallowing

hallow

/ˈhæləʊ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to consecrate or set apart as being holy
2.
to venerate as being holy
Derived Forms
hallower, noun
Word Origin
Old English hālgian, from hāligholy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hallowing

hallow

v.

Old English halgian "to make holy, to honor as holy, consecrate, ordain," related to halig "holy," from Proto-Germanic *hailaga- (cf. Old Saxon helagon, Middle Dutch heligen, Old Norse helga), from PIE root *kailo- "whole, uninjured, of good omen" (see health). Used in Christian translations to render Latin sanctificare. Also used since Old English as a noun meaning "holy person, saint." Related: Hallowed; hallowing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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hallowing in the Bible

to render sacred, to consecrate (Ex. 28:38; 29:1). This word is from the Saxon, and properly means "to make holy." The name of God is "hallowed", i.e., is reverenced as holy (Matt. 6:9).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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