Hatcher

hatch

1 [hach]
verb (used with object)
1.
to bring forth (young) from the egg.
2.
to cause young to emerge from (the egg) as by brooding or incubating.
3.
to bring forth or produce; devise; create; contrive; concoct: to hatch a scheme.
verb (used without object)
4.
to be hatched.
5.
to brood.
noun
6.
the act of hatching.
7.
something that is hatched, as a brood.

Origin:
1200–50; Middle English hacchen; akin to German hecken to hatch

hatchable, adjective
hatchability, noun
hatcher, noun
unhatchability, noun
unhatchable, adjective


1. incubate, brood. 3. plan, plot.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
hatch1 (hætʃ)
 
vb
1.  to cause (the young of various animals, esp birds) to emerge from the egg or (of young birds, etc) to emerge from the egg
2.  to cause (eggs) to break and release the fully developed young or (of eggs) to break and release the young animal within
3.  (tr) to contrive or devise (a scheme, plot, etc)
 
n
4.  the act or process of hatching
5.  a group of newly hatched animals
 
[C13: of Germanic origin; compare Middle High German hecken to mate (used of birds), Swedish häcka to hatch, Danish hække]
 
'hatchable1
 
adj
 
'hatcher1
 
n

hatch2 (hætʃ)
 
n
1.  a covering for a hatchway
2.  a.  short for hatchway
 b.  a door in an aircraft or spacecraft
3.  Also called: serving hatch an opening in a wall between a kitchen and a dining area
4.  the lower half of a divided door
5.  a sluice or sliding gate in a dam, dyke, or weir
6.  slang down the hatch (used as a toast) drink up!
7.  under hatches
 a.  below decks
 b.  out of sight
 c.  brought low; dead
 
[Old English hæcc; related to Middle High German heck, Dutch hek gate]

hatch3 (hætʃ)
 
vb
art Compare hachure to mark (a figure, shade, etc) with fine parallel or crossed lines to indicate shading
 
[C15: from Old French hacher to chop, from hachehatchet]
 
'hatching3
 
n

hatch4 (hætʃ)
 
n
informal short for hatchback

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hatch
"to produce young from eggs by incubation," from M.E. hachen (mid-13c.), probably from O.E. *hæccan, of unknown origin. Hatchery is first recorded 1880.

hatch
O.E. hæc (gen. hæcce) "fence, gate," from P.Gmc. *khak- (cf. M.H.G. heck, Du. hek "fence, gate"). Sense of "plank opening in ship's deck" is first recorded mid-13c. Drinking phrase down the hatch first recorded 1931. Hatchback as a type of rear door of an automobile is from 1970.

hatch
"drawn fine parallel lines," 1389, from O.Fr. hacher "chop, hatch," from hache "axe" (see hatchet).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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