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Moody

[moo-dee] /ˈmu di/
noun
1.
Dwight Lyman
[lahy-muh n] /ˈlaɪ mən/ (Show IPA),
1837–99, U.S. evangelist.
2.
Helen Wills, Wills, Helen Newington.
3.
William Vaughn
[vawn] /vɔn/ (Show IPA),
1869–1910, U.S. poet and playwright.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for helen w moody

moody

/ˈmuːdɪ/
adjective moodier, moodiest
1.
sullen, sulky, or gloomy
2.
temperamental or changeable
Derived Forms
moodily, adverb
moodiness, noun

Moody

/ˈmuːdɪ/
noun
1.
Dwight Lyman. 1837–99, US evangelist and hymnodist, noted for his revivalist campaigns in Britain and the US with I. D. Sankey
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for helen w moody
moody
O.E. modig "brave, proud, high-spirited;" meaning "subject to gloomy spells" is first recorded 1590s (via a M.E. sense of "angry"); see mood (1).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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helen w moody in Medicine

moody mood·y (mōō'dē)
adj. mood·i·er, mood·i·est

  1. Given to frequent changes of mood; temperamental.

  2. Subject to periods of depression; sulky.

  3. Expressive of a mood, especially a sullen or gloomy mood.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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