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Irving

[ur-ving] /ˈɜr vɪŋ/
noun
1.
Sir Henry (John Henry Brodribb) 1838–1905, English actor.
2.
John, born 1942, U.S. novelist.
3.
Washington, 1783–1859, U.S. essayist, story writer, and historian.
4.
a city in NE Texas, near Dallas.
5.
a male given name.

Morgan

[mawr-guh n] /ˈmɔr gən/
noun
1.
Charles Langbridge
[lang-brij] /ˈlæŋˌbrɪdʒ/ (Show IPA),
1894–1958, English novelist and critic.
2.
Daniel, 1736–1802, American Revolutionary general.
3.
Sir Henry, 1635?–88, Welsh buccaneer in the Americas.
4.
John Hunt, 1826–64, Confederate general in the American Civil War.
5.
J(ohn) P(ierpont)
[peer-pont] /ˈpɪər pɒnt/ (Show IPA),
1837–1913, U.S. financier and philanthropist.
6.
his son, John Pierpont, 1867–1943, U.S. financier.
7.
Julia, 1872–1957, U.S. architect.
8.
Lewis Henry, 1818–81, U.S. ethnologist and anthropologist.
9.
Thomas Hunt, 1866–1945, U.S. zoologist: Nobel Prize in medicine 1933.
10.
a male or female given name.

Percy

[pur-see] /ˈpɜr si/
noun
1.
Sir Henry ("Hotspur") 1364–1403, English military and rebel leader.
2.
Thomas, 1729–1811, English poet and antiquary: bishop of Dromore 1782–1811.
3.
Walker, 1916–90, U.S. essayist and novelist.
4.
a male given name, form of Percival.

Raeburn

[rey-bern] /ˈreɪ bərn/
noun
1.
Sir Henry, 1756–1823, Scottish painter.

Tate

[teyt] /teɪt/
noun
1.
Sir Henry, 1819–99, English merchant and philanthropist: founder of an art gallery (Tate Gallery) in London, England.
2.
(John Orley) Allen
[awr-lee] /ˈɔr li/ (Show IPA),
1899–1979, U.S. poet, critic, and editor.
3.
James, born 1943, U.S. poet.
4.
Nahum
[ney-uh m,, -huh m] /ˈneɪ əm,, -həm/ (Show IPA),
1652–1715, English poet and playwright, born in Ireland: poet laureate 1692–1715.

Vane

[veyn] /veɪn/
noun
1.
Sir Henry (Sir Harry Vane) 1613–62, British statesman and author.

Bessemer

[bes-uh-mer] /ˈbɛs ə mər/
noun
1.
Sir Henry, 1813–98, English engineer: inventor of the Bessemer process.
2.
a city in central Alabama.

Bulwer

[boo l-wer] /ˈbʊl wər/
noun
1.
Sir Henry (William Henry Lytton Earle Bulwer; Baron Dalling and Bulwer) 1801–72, British diplomat and author.

Campbell-Bannerman

[kam-buh l-ban-er-muh n, kam-uh l-] /ˈkæm bəlˈbæn ər mən, ˈkæm əl-/
noun
1.
Sir Henry, 1836–1908, British statesman, born in Ireland: prime minister 1905–08.

Clinton

[klin-tn] /ˈklɪn tn/
noun
1.
De Witt
[duh wit] /də ˈwɪt/ (Show IPA),
1769–1828, U.S. political leader and statesman: governor of New York 1817–21, 1825–28 (son of James Clinton).
2.
George, 1739–1812, governor of New York 1777–95, 1801–04: vice president of the U.S. 1805–12.
3.
Sir Henry, 1738?–95, commander in chief of the British forces in the American Revolutionary War.
4.
Hillary (Rodham) born 1947, U.S. politician: senator from New York 2001–2009; secretary of state 2009–2013 (wife of William J. Clinton).
5.
James, 1733–1812, American general in the Revolutionary War (brother of George Clinton).
6.
William J(efferson) ("Bill") born 1946, 42nd president of the U.S. 1993–2001.
7.
a city in E Iowa, on the Mississippi River.
8.
a city in central Maryland.
9.
a town in W Mississippi.
10.
a city in central Massachusetts.
11.
a town in S Connecticut.
12.
a male given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for henry, sir

Campbell-Bannerman

/ˈkæmbəlˈbænəmən/
noun
1.
Sir Henry. 1836–1908, British statesman and leader of the Liberal Party (1899–1908); prime minister (1905–08), who granted self-government to the Transvaal and the Orange River Colony

Clinton

/ˈklɪntən/
noun
1.
Bill, full name William Jefferson Clinton. born 1946, US Democrat politician; 42nd president of the US (1993–2001)
2.
his wife, Hillary Rodham. born 1947, US Democrat politician and lawyer: first lady (1993–2001); senator (2001–09); secretary of state (2009–13)

Irving

/ˈɜːvɪŋ/
noun
1.
Sir Henry. real name John Henry Brodribb. 1838–1905, English actor and manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London (1878–1902)
2.
Washington. 1783–1859, US essayist and short-story writer, noted for The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon (1820), which contains the stories Rip Van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

Morgan1

/ˈmɔːɡən/
noun
1.
an American breed of small compact saddle horse
Word Origin
C19: named after Justin Morgan (1747–98), American owner of the original sire

Morgan2

/ˈmɔːɡən/
noun
1.
Edwin (George). (1920–2010), Scottish poet, noted esp for his collection The Second Life (1968) and his many concrete and visual poems; appointed Scottish national poet 2004
2.
Sir Henry. 1635–88, Welsh buccaneer, who raided Spanish colonies in the West Indies for the English
3.
John Pierpont. 1837–1913, US financier, philanthropist, and art collector
4.
(Hywel) Rhodri (ˈrɒdrɪ). born 1939, Welsh Labour politician; first minister of Wales (2000–09)
5.
Thomas Hunt. 1866–1945, US biologist. He formulated the chromosome theory of heredity. Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1933

Percy

/ˈpɜːsɪ/
noun
1.
Sir Henry, known as Harry Hotspur. 1364–1403, English rebel, who was killed leading an army against Henry IV
2.
Thomas. 1729–1811, English bishop and antiquary. His Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (1765) stimulated the interest of Romantic writers in old English and Scottish ballads

Raeburn

/ˈreɪˌbɜːn/
noun
1.
Sir Henry. 1756–1823, Scottish portrait painter

Tate

/teɪt/
noun
1.
(John Orley) Allen. 1899–1979, US poet and critic
2.
Sir Henry. 1819–99, British sugar refiner and philanthropist; founder of the Tate Gallery
3.
Nahum (ˈneɪʊm). 1652–1715, British poet, dramatist, and hymn-writer, born in Ireland: poet laureate (1692–1715). He is best known for writing a version of King Lear with a happy ending

vane

/veɪn/
noun
1.
Also called weather vane, wind vane. a flat plate or blade of metal mounted on a vertical axis in an exposed position to indicate wind direction
2.
any one of the flat blades or sails forming part of the wheel of a windmill
3.
any flat or shaped plate used to direct fluid flow, esp a stator blade in a turbine, etc
4.
a fin or plate fitted to a projectile or missile to provide stabilization or guidance
5.
(ornithol) the flat part of a feather, consisting of two rows of barbs on either side of the shaft
6.
(surveying)
  1. a sight on a quadrant or compass
  2. the movable marker on a levelling staff
Derived Forms
vaned, adjective
vaneless, adjective
Word Origin
Old English fana; related to Old Saxon, Old High German fano, Old Norse fani, Latin pannus cloth

Vane

/veɪn/
noun
1.
Sir Henry, known as Sir Harry Vane. 1613–62, English Puritan statesman and colonial administrator; governor of Massachusetts (1636–37). He was executed for high treason after the Restoration
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for henry, sir

vane

n.

"wind indicator," early 15c., southern England alteration (see V) of fane.

Bessemer

in reference to the process for decarbonizing and desiliconizing pig iron by passing air through the molten metal, 1856, named for engineer and inventor Sir Harry Bessemer (1813-1898) who invented it.

Morgan

surname, a very old Celtic name. As a type of horse, 1840, named for Justin Morgan (1747-1798), Vermont horse-breeder and music teacher; the breed was developed from a stallion he owned.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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henry, sir in Medicine

morgan mor·gan (môr'gən)
n.

Abbr. M A unit for expressing the relative distance between genes on a chromosome based on the frequency with which the genes cross over; one unit equals a theoretical crossover value of 100 percent between two loci.

Morgan Mor·gan (môr'gən), Thomas Hunt. 1866-1945.

American biologist. He won a 1933 Nobel Prize for establishing the chromosome theory of heredity by his studies of the fruit fly Drosophila.

Vane (vān), John Robert. Born 1927.

British pharmacologist. He shared a 1982 Nobel Prize for research on prostaglandins.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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henry, sir in Science
Morgan
  (môr'gən)   
American zoologist whose experiments with fruit flies demonstrated that hereditary traits are carried by genes on chromosomes and that traits can cross over from one chromosome to another. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine in 1933.
vane
  (vān)   
The flattened, weblike part of a feather, consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the rachis.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Article for henry, sir

Bessemer

city, Jefferson county, north-central Alabama, U.S., about 15 miles (25 km) southwest of downtown Birmingham in the foothills of the southern Appalachian Mountains. Named for inventor and engineer Sir Henry Bessemer, it was founded on the site of Fort Jonesboro in 1887 by Henry F. DeBardeleben, a local coal and iron baron who built the first steel plant in the area. The city was planned as a steel centre, and its manufactures included railroad cars, pipe, structural materials, chemicals, and explosives. Service industries now dominate the city's economy, but the manufacture of metal products remains important. Tannehill Ironworks Historical State Park is 12 miles (19 km) southwest of Bessemer and hosts the Southern Appalachian Dulcimer Festival in May. Inc. 1888. Pop. (1990) 33,497; (2000) 29,672.

Learn more about Bessemer with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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