hernia

[hur-nee-uh]
noun, plural hernias, herniae [hur-nee-ee] . Pathology.
the protrusion of an organ or tissue through an opening in its surrounding walls, especially in the abdominal region.


Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin: a rupture; akin to hīra gut; see haruspex

hernial, adjective
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World English Dictionary
hernia (ˈhɜːnɪə)
 
n , pl -nias, -niae
Also called: rupture the projection of an organ or part through the lining of the cavity in which it is normally situated, esp the protrusion of intestine through the front wall of the abdominal cavity. It is caused by muscular strain, injury, etc
 
[C14: from Latin]
 
'hernial
 
adj
 
'herniated
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hernia
late 14c., from L. hernia "a rupture," related to hira "intestine," from the same root as yarn.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

hernia her·ni·a (hûr'nē-ə)
n. pl. her·ni·as
The protrusion of an organ or other bodily structure through the wall that normally contains it.


her'ni·al adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
hernia   (hûr'nē-ə)  Pronunciation Key 
A condition in which an organ or body part, such as the intestine, protrudes through an opening in the body structure that normally contains it.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
hernia [(hur-nee-uh)]

The projection of an organ or part of an organ through the wall of the structure that surrounds it. Most often, the term is applied to the protrusion of a part of the intestine that can be observed as a lump in the lower abdomen.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences for hernia
Another common hernia involves the intervertebral disc, and causes back pain or
  sciatica.
Repair techniques are similar for femoral and inguinal hernia.
Brain hernia herniation of part of the brain because of excessive intracranial
  pressure.
This type of hernia is only a rare cause of sciatic neuralgia.
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