heroin

[her-oh-in]
noun Pharmacology.
a white, crystalline, narcotic powder, C 21 H 23 NO 5 , derived from morphine, formerly used as an analgesic and sedative: manufacture and importation of heroin are now controlled by federal law in the U.S. because of the danger of addiction.


Origin:
1895–1900; formerly trademark; < German Heroin < Greek hērō-, stem of hḗrōs hero + German -in -in2; allegedly so called from the feelings of power and euphoria which it stimulates

heroin, heroine.
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World English Dictionary
heroin (ˈhɛrəʊɪn)
 
n
diamorphine, Technical names: diacetylmorphine a white odourless bitter-tasting crystalline powder related to morphine: a highly addictive narcotic. Formula: C21H23NO5
 
[C19: coined in German as a trademark, probably from hero, referring to its aggrandizing effect on the personality]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

heroin
from Ger. Heroin, coined 1898 as trademark registered by Friedrich Bayer & Co. for their morphine substitute, traditionally from Gk. heros (see hero) because of the euphoric feeling the drug provides.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

heroin her·o·in (hěr'ō-ĭn)
n.
A white, bitter, crystalline compound that is derived from morphine and is a highly addictive narcotic. Also called diacetylmorphine.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
heroin   (hěr'ō-ĭn)  Pronunciation Key 
A white, odorless, bitter crystalline compound, C17H17NO(C2H3O2)2, that is derived from morphine and is a highly addictive narcotic.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Somebody bring me some white bread to eat and a spoon for cooking my heroin.
The threat of relapse hangs over any attempt to kick a heroin addiction.
The rehabilitation clinics that serve them specialise in treating heroin and
  crack-cocaine addiction.
Opium production has been reduced, but heroin trafficking is still a problem.
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