hickory stripe

hickory

[hik-uh-ree, hik-ree]
noun, plural hickories.
1.
any of several North American trees belonging to the genus Carya, of the walnut family, certain species of which bear edible nuts or yield a valuable wood. Compare pecan, shagbark.
2.
the wood of any of these trees.
3.
a switch, stick, etc., of this wood.
4.
Baseball Slang. a baseball bat.
5.
Also called hickory cloth, hickory stripe. a strong fabric of twill construction, used chiefly in the manufacture of work clothes.

Origin:
1610–20, Americanism; earlier pohickery < Virginia Algonquian (E spelling) pocohiquara a milky drink prepared from hickory nuts

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World English Dictionary
hickory (ˈhɪkərɪ)
 
n , pl -ries
1.  pecan pignut bitternut See also shagbark any juglandaceous tree of the chiefly North American genus Carya, having nuts with edible kernels and hard smooth shells
2.  the hard tough wood of any of these trees
3.  the nut of any of these trees
4.  a switch or cane made of hickory wood
 
[C17: from earlier pohickery, from Algonquian pawcohiccora food made from ground hickory nuts]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hickory
1671, Amer.Eng., from Algonquian (perhaps Powhatan), shortening of pockerchicory or a similar name for this species of walnut. Old Hickory as the nickname of U.S. politician Andrew Jackson is first recorded 1827.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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