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hippie

[hip-ee] /ˈhɪp i/
noun
1.
a person, especially of the late 1960s, who rejected established institutions and values and sought spontaneity, direct personal relations expressing love, and expanded consciousness, often expressed externally in the wearing of casual, folksy clothing and of beads, headbands, used garments, etc.
Also, hippy.
Compare flower child.
Origin
1950-1955
1950-55, Americanism; hip4 + -ie
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for hip-pie

hippie

/ˈhɪpɪ/
noun
1.
a variant spelling of hippy1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hip-pie

hippie

n.

c.1965, American English (Haight-Ashbury slang); earlier hippie, 1953, was a usually disparaging variant of hipster (1941) "person who is keenly aware of the new and stylish," from hip "up-to-date" (see hip (adj.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for hip-pie

hippie

modifier

: Saigon has acquired an elaborate hippie culture

noun

One of a group of usually young persons who reject the values of conventional society and withdraw into drifting, communes, etc, espouse peace and universal love, typically wear long hair and beards, and use marijuana or psychedelic drugs; beat, beatnik

[1960s+ Counterculture; fr hip]


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Encyclopedia Article for hip-pie

hippie

member, during the 1960s and 1970s, of a countercultural movement that rejected the mores of mainstream American life. The movement originated on college campuses in the United States, although it spread to other countries, including Canada and Britain. The name derived from "hip," a term applied to the Beats of the 1950s, such as Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac, who were generally considered to be the precursors of hippies. Although the movement arose in part as opposition to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War (1955-75), hippies were often not directly engaged in politics, as opposed to their activist counterparts known as "Yippies" (Youth International Party)

Learn more about hippie with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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8
8
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